The lives of J. Selden ... and abp. Usher

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40. oldal - That the liberties, franchises, privileges and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
189. oldal - Others apart sat on a hill retired, In thoughts more elevate, and reasoned high Of Providence, Foreknowledge, Will, and Fate— Fixed fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute — And found no end, in wandering mazes lost.
365. oldal - I take my subjects money when I want it, without all this formality in parliament ? The bishop of Durham readily answered, God forbid, Sir, but you should ; you are the breath of our nostrils : whereupon the king turned and said to the bishop of Winchester, well, my lord, what say you ? Sir, replied the bishop, I have no skill to judge of parliamentary cases. The king answered, no put-offs, my lord, answer me presently.
112. oldal - Parliament, the chief of learned men reputed in this land, Mr. Selden, whose volume of natural and national laws proves, not only by great authorities brought together, but by exquisite reasons and theorems almost mathematically demonstrative, that all opinions, yea, errors, known, read, and collated, arc of main service and assistance toward the speedy attainment of what is truest.
112. oldal - Peter, kill and eat, leaving the choice to each man's discretion. Wholesome meats, to a vitiated stomach, differ little or nothing .from unwholesome; and best books to a naughty mind are not unappliable to occasions of evil. Bad meats will scarce breed good nourishment in the healthiest concoction; but herein the difference is of bad books, that they to a discreet and judicious reader serve in many respects to discover, to confute, to forewarn, and to illustrate.
192. oldal - London ; and he was very much troubled always when he heard him blamed, censured, and reproached, for staying in London, and in the parliament, after they were in rebellion, and in the worst times, which his age obliged him to do; and how wicked soever the actions were which were every day done, he was confident he had not given his consent to them ; but would have hindered them if he could with his own safety, to which he was always enough indulgent. If he had some infirmities with other men, they...
192. oldal - ... making hard things easy, and presenting them to the understanding of any man that hath been known. Mr. Hyde was wont to say that he valued himself upon nothing more than upon having had Mr. Selden's acquaintance from the time he was very young, and held it with great delight as long as they were suffered to continue together in London ; and he was...
233. oldal - The religion of the papists is superstitious and idolatrous; their faith and doctrine, erroneous and heretical, their church, in respect of both, apostatical. To give them therefore a toleration, or to consent that they may freely exercise their religion, and professe their faith and doctrine, is a grievous sinnc, and that in two respects.
186. oldal - Commonly we say a judgment falls upon a man for something in him we cannot abide.
183. oldal - In all times the Princes in England have done something illegal to get Money: but then came a Parliament and all was well; the People and the Prince kissed and were Friends, and so things were quiet for a while. Afterwards there was another Trick found out to get Money, and after they had got it, another Parliament was called to set all right, &c. But now they have so out-run the Constable...

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