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LONDON, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1863. ignorant of the author without being absolutely a

fool.” CONTENTS.- No. 81.

Nevertheless, as we shall find, Dodsley was NOTES:- Hudibrastic Couplet, 61 - Archbishop Leigh

more to be excused than censured for his authoriton's Library at Dunblane, 63 - The “Faerie Queene" tative averment. He never dreamt for a moment, Unveiled, 65 - Traitor's Gate, Tower of London, 66.

good soul, that any one would have the presumpMINOR NOTES :- Curious Anachronism by an Old Drama tion to interpolate the text of Butler with the tist - Errata in King's “Life of Locke" - Rolling the R's

lines in dispute, as unquestionably had been the - Letters of Marque-A Niece of Oliver Goldsmith, 67.

case. A literary fraud had however been played QUERIES :- Apparitions, 68 -" Boadicea" - Robert Burns and George the Fourth - Catherine de Medicis – Cow.

off" upon him, and the public generally, and that thorpe Oak, near Wetherby, Yorkshire -- German Drama too by one of his own former associates — -Heraldic Queries - Cardinal Howard-Johnstone the Freemason - Longevity of Incumbents —"Macbeth" Morrison's Crystal - Thomas, Duke of Norfolk - Elijah

“Who wrote like an angel, but talk'd like poor Poll.” Ridings - St. Germain - Sugar-tongs like a Stork, 69.

It was in the year 1762 that John Newbery QUERIES WITH ANSWERS:-- Radnorshire Rhyme - Jacob's

first published a valuable collection, entitled Staff - Agricola's Victory - Sandtoft Register - Cockpit, 70.

“ THE ART OF POETRY ON A New Plan: illustrated REPLIES:- Wonderful Animal, 71 - Miss Vane: “Dis

with a great Variety of Examples from the best English appointed Love," 72-Guérin de Montaigu, 16, - Exchequer: or Exchecquer-Cheque, 73 - Horse Police - Theo Poets; and of Translations from the Ancients: together dolite-Yealand and Ashton - Mayors' Robes -- Monu

with such Reflections and Critical Remarks as may tend mental Brass - “Virgini Parituræ ” — Bridport, &c. "Old Dominiou" --Law of Lauriston -- Queen Isabella,

to form in our Youth an elegant Taste, and render the "the Catholic " -- Rev. John Sampson -- Death of the Czar Study of this part of the Belles Lettres more rational and Nicholas -- Daffy's Elixir - Ralegh Arms - St. YusteWalsall-legged - Earldom of Errol -" Miller of the Dee"

pleasing." London, 2 vols. 12mo. 1762. --Richard Westbrook Baker, 74.

This work is admirably calculated to lead the Notes on Books, &c.

youthful mind to an acquaintance with the writings of the best English poets, and appears to have

been well received by the public ; for at least four Nates.

editions, with different title-pages, were published HUDIBRASTIC COUPLET.

between the years 1762 and 1776.* In its com

pilation a sound judgment was displayed in the It was in the autumnal month of August, 1784,

selection of the choicest passages from each author; as the story goes, that some wits over their wine

whilst in the rules and observations which accomat Brooks's Club House in St. James's Street,

pany them, the pen of a poetical genius of no orwere found wrangling among themselves respect

dinary ability is clearly to be traced. ing the authorship of the famed couplet:

The selection of the metrical specimens has “For he who fights and runs away

always been attributed to John Newbery; but May live to fight another day.”

for their revision and alterations we are indebted

to the critical taste of Oliver Goldsmith, as he A wager of twenty to one was offered that the lines would be found in that inimitable produc

himself acknowledged to Dr. Percy.t In the

perusal of the examples from the works of our tion, Butler's Hudibras. Pendente lite, they agreed that James Dodsley, the bookseller, should be

poets, the reader, naturally enough, would infer

that the extracts had been made in good faith, the arbiter. The worthy bibliopole, on being summoned, felt somewhat ruffled in temper on leaving his business to decide a point which, to * The Second Edition I have not been able to trace. bis own satisfaction at least, did not admit of any The Third and Fourth are clearly abridgments, with question. “Every fool," said he, “knows that

considerable variations, but both contain the passage from

Hudibras. These are entitled : they are in Hudibras ;" so true is it that men are

“ Poetry made Familiar and Easy to Young Gentlemen too apt to be mistaken in the exact proportion as | and Ladies, and embellished with a great variety of the they are positive. George Selwyn, who happened most shining Epigrams, Epitaphs, Songs, Odes, Pastorals, to be one of the dissentients, coolly replied, “Will &c. from the best Autbors. Being the Fourth Volume of you be good enough then to inform an old fool,

The Circle of the Seasons. Published by the King's

Authority. Third Edition, London: Printed for Newwho is at the same time your wise worship's most

bery and Carnan, No. 65, the north side of St. Paul's bumble servant, in what canto they are to be Churchyard. 1769." 32mo, pp. 224. found ?" Dodsley, feeling confident that he was | “ Logic, Ontology, and the Art of Poetry; being the right, immediately opened the volume, but un

Fourth and Fifth Volumes of The Circle of the Sciences, luckily for himself could not discover the required

considerably enlarged, and greatly improved. London,

Printed for T. Carnan and F. Newbery, jun, at No. 65 in passage in it. After passing a tedious night in

St. Paul's Churchyard, 1776, 12mo." the pursuit of the pugnacious fugitive, he was at + Prior's Life of Goldsmith, i. 389; Forster's Life of last compelled to confess," that a man might be | Goldsmith, i. 298, edit. 1854.

ipsissima verba, especially as not the least intimation is given, either in Newberry's Dedication to the Earl of Holderness or in his Advertisement to the Reader, of any variorum readings.

Part III. of Butler's Hudibras was first printed in 1678. In canto iii. lines 241—246 of that edition, Ralph and his Quixotic superior, having been unhorsed and beaten, very prudently refrain from another encounter, but resolve

“ To make an honourable retreat,

And wave a total sure defeat ;
For those who fly may fight again,
Which he can never do that's slain. .
Hence timely running's no mean part

Of conduct in the martial art.” The same reading will be found in the editions of 1684, 1689, 1693, and 1700. Goldsmith, however, in the Art of Poetry on a New Plan, ii. 147, has not faithfully copied the original text; and forgetting, for once, what Shakspeare has taught us, that “Brevity is the soul of wit,” has paraphrased a couplet into four lines. The variations in the following passage, as cited by him, I have distinguished by small capital letters:

“Who can forbear (says he) smiling at that sound and salutary reasoning, whereby Squire Ralpho demonstrates the prudence and advantage of a timely flight, rather than staying to be slain in battle? It is generally allowed, that a well conducted retreat is almost as honourable as a victory; but perhaps the wisdom of running away from an enemy was never proved by such arguments as are contained in the following lines :

I, with reason, chose
This stratagem, t'amuse our foes,
To make an hon'rable retreat,
And wave a total sure defeat:
FOR HE WHO FIGHTS AND RUNS AWAY
MAY LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY;
BUT HE WHO IS IN BATTLE SLAIN
CAN NEVER RISE AND FIGHT AGAIN.
Hence timely running's no mean part
Of conduct in the martial art;
By which some glorious feats atchieve,
As citizens, by breaking, thrive;
And cannons conquer armies, while
They seem to draw off and recoil.
'Tis held the gallant'st course and bravest,
To great exploits, as well as safest,
That spares th' expence of time and pains,
And dang'rous beating out of brains ;
And in the end prevails as certain
As those that never trust to fortune,
To make their fear do execution
Beyond the stoutest resolution;
As earthquakes kill without a blow,
And, only trembling, overthrow.
If th' ancients crown'd their bravest men
That only say'd a citizen,

What victory could e'er be won,
If ev'ry one would save but one?
Or fight endanger'd to be lost,
Where all resolve to save the most?
By this means, when a battle's won,
The war's as far from being done ;
For those that save themselves, and fly,
Go halves, at least, i' th' victory;
And sometimes, when the loss is small,
And danger great, they challenge all;
Print new additions to their feats,
And emendations in gazettes;
And when, for furious haste to run,
They durst not stay to fire a gun,
Have don't with bonfires, and at home
Made squibs and crackers overcome;
To set the rabble on a flame,
And keep their governors from blame,
Disperse the news the pulpit tells,
Confirm'd with fire-works and with bells :
And tho’ reduc'd to that extreme
They have been forc'd to sing Te Deum,
Yet with religious blasphemy,
By flatt'ring heaven with a lie,
And, for their beating, giving thanks,
They've rais'd recruits, and fill’d their banks :
For those who run from th' enemy
Engage them equally to fly;
And when the fight becomes a chace,

Those win the day that win the race. But it is time to have done; for to select all the beautiful passages of this inimitable poem, we should be obliged to transcribe almost the whole.”

To most readers it is well known that the sentiment conveyed in the above memorable lines may be found in the verse made either by or for Demosthenes, as his best apology for running away at the battle of Chæronea, and leaving his shield behind him; and which sentiment subsequently was adopted by Aulus Gellius, Erasmus, Jeremy Taylor, and by the author of the Satyre Menippée, 1594.

Since the publication of Lowndes's Bibliographer's Manual in 1834, where it is stated that these lines occur in the Musarum Deliciæ, p. 101, ed. 1656, our literary antiquaries have comfortably consoled themselves with the idea that Sir John Mennis was the author of them; but although most of our public and private libraries have been carefully searched with the lantern of Diogenes, no copy as yet has been discovered containing them. To get over the difficulty, the editor of the new edition of Lowndes tells us (p. 1535) that “in some copies a cancelled leaf (reprinted in the new edition) is found, in which are the lines ;." but he has not informed us that, during his long experience in literature, the original leaf had either been seen by himself or by any one else.

Goldsmith died in 1774, just ten years before

the inquiry was started respecting the origin of 4. The Puritan turned Jesuit. this familiar couplet. Great, indeed, would have

5. Zeal Examined.

6. Persuasive to Moderation to Church Dissenters. been the saving of ink and paper, not only in the

7. Account of the Bloodshed occasioned by the Jesuits. Europeun and Gentleman's Niagazines, but in the

8. Sufferings of the Protestant Ministers in Hungary. Two Series of Notes and Queries, had poor Goldy 9. Lex Talionis. been permitted, in the visible order of things, to 10. Five Pence. have made one of the literary gathering at Brooks's

11. Marionis Enchiridion Loc. Com. Theol. Club, when doubtless he would have humbly

12. Mayerus de Vulneribus Ecclesiæ Romanæ.

13. Apuleius Castigated. confessed, that during a convenient temporary 14. La Sylvie Tragicum Pastorale [by Jean Mairet, seclusion with his friend Newbery in Canonbury 1621?] Tower he had unwittingly penned these celebrated 15. Les Bergeries de Maistre. lines, the authorship of which, for eighty long 16. Thorndike's Way of Composing Differences. years, has baffled the researches, and puzzled the With regard to the first, all I know is, that Leo, ingenuity of the whole literary brotherhood or Leone, was an Italian Jew, a physician by pro

J. YEOWELI.. fession, who became a Christian, and published 4, Minerva Terrace, Barnsbury.

some mystical Dialogi di Amore at Rome in 1535, frequently reprinted and translated. His Life

must be a book of extreme rarity. Some writers ARCHBISHOP LEIGHTON'S LIBRARY AT DUN.

say that his real, or original, name was Rabbi Judah BLANE.

Abarbanel ; if so, probably a relative of the cele

brated R. Isaac Abarbanel, who died at Venice in On the 17th of last September I paid another visit to Dunblane, and spent three weeks there,

1508. Brunet, amongst others, calls him Abar

banel.. during which time I made a catalogue of Arch.

No. 2 seems connected with the following pambishop Leighton's books, and took copious ex

phlet: tracts from his fly-leaf memoranda. The catalogue

“ Letters from Several Ministers in and about Edinis ready for the press, but I have given up the

p the burgh to the Ministers of London, concerning the Reintention intimated in a former paper (“N. & Q." | establishing of the Covenant. Edinb. 1659,” 4to. 3rd S. i. 6) of publishing it in a separate volume,

No. 4 is, no doubt, Dr. John Owen's treatise, as it seems more desirable to include it in my

The Puritan turned Jesuit, Lond. 1643, 4to. I forthcoming edition of the works. In the cata

should be glad, however, to get some notion of logue the lost books are denoted by italics, and every book containing any of Leighton's writing

the scope of this attack on his “Puritan" brethren is marked by an obelisk (t) prefixed, or by two

by the great Independent divine? when there is much writing.

One of Leighton's books is entitled Minus Celsus A few illustrative

Senensis de Hereticis Capitali Supplicio non Affinotes are appended to the rarer and more remarkable books.

ciendis, s. l. 1584, 12mo. Is not the name fictitious,

and was not this book really written by the celeI am happy to say that but one hundred of the

brated Hungarian Bishop, Andrew Dudith ? archbishop's books have been lost, and these in

Did the great Port-Royalist, Antoine Arnauld, clude pamphlets and small works ; besides, there

write La Tradition de l'Eglise touchant lEuchaare some twenty-four odd volumes missing. Of

ristie, 2 vols. 8vo, Paris, 1659 ? He did write these hundred works, but sixteen were lost during the fifty years that elapsed between 1793 and

a supplement to it, entitled Table Historique des

SS. Pères, &c., dont les passages sont compris dans 1843, wben the two catalogues were respectively printed ; * and of the odd volumes but two, viz.

| l'ouvrage intitulé, Tradition de l'Eglise sur l'Euvols. iii. and vi. of S. Austin's Works.

charistie.. The

| Leighton had a great reverence for one whose books of Leighton's library now extant number about 1230; of these, 206 contain his MS. notes

character and career in many respects strikingly

resembled his own, the pious Dom Barthelemy des and memorabilia. The following are some of the lost works, chiefly

Martyrs, Archbishop of Braga. He often recom

mended the Stimulus Pastorum of the Portuguese pamphlets, which as yet I have not been able to identify in any bibliographical works within reach,

prelate, and used to lament that he never could and therefore should be thankful for assistance:

get a copy of the original Latin, but was obliged

| to be content with the French version, now in the 1. La Vita di Leo Hebr. 2. Warning anent the Reg (sic. Re-establishing?]

library. Will some one kindly inform me respectScottish Discipline.

ing the first and chief subsequent editions of this 3. Confessions of the Protestant Divines concerning book so much prized by Leighton ? The Vie de Episcopacy.

D. Barthelemy has been attributed to each of the * I am indebted to the kindness of Sir James Camp

celebrated brothers, Antoine and Louis Isaac Le bell, Bart., one of the Trustees, for a loan of the catalogue

Maistre, but is said to bave been really written by of 1793, perhaps the only existing copy.

Thomas Du Fossé. What is known of Du Fossé?.

ipsissima verba, especially as not the least intimation is given, either in Newberry's Dedication to the Earl of Holderness or in bis Advertisement to the Reader, of any variorum readings.

Part III. of Butler's Hudibras was first printed in 1678. In canto iii. lines 241–246 of that edition, Ralph and his Quixotic superior, baving been unhorsed and beaten, very prudently refrain from another encounter, but resolve —

“ To make an honourable retreat,

And wave a total sure defeat;
For those who fly may fight again,
Which he can never do that's slain.
Hence timely running's no mean part

Of conduct in the martial art." The same reading will be found in the editions of 1684, 1689, 1693, and 1700. Goldsmith, however, in the Art of Poetry on a New Plan, ii. 147, has not faitbfully copied the original text; and forgetting, for once, what Shakspeare has taught us, that “ Brevity is the soul of wit," has paraphrased a couplet into four lines. The variations in the following passage, as cited by him, I have distinguished by small capital letters:

“Who can forbear (says he) smiling at that sound and salutary reasoning, whereby Squire Ralpho demonstrates the prudence and advantage of a timely flight, rather than staying to be slain in battle? It is generally allowed, that a well conducted retreat is almost as honourable as a victory; but perhaps the wisdom of running away from an enemy was never proved by such arguments as are contained in the following lines:

- I, with reason, chose
This stratagem, t'amuse our foes,
To make an hon'rable retreat,
And wave a total sure defeat:
FOR HE WHO FIGHTS AND RUNS AWAY
MAY LIVE TO FIGHT ANOTHER DAY;
BUT HE WHO IS IN BATTLE SLAIN
CAN NEVER RISE AND FIGHT AGAIN.
Hence timely running's no mean part
Of conduct in the martial art;
By which some glorious feats atchieve,
As citizens, by breaking, thrive;
And cannons conquer armies, while
They seem to draw off and recoil.
'Tis held the gallant'st course and bravest,
To great exploits, as well as safest,
That spares th' expence of time and pains,
And dang'rous beating out of brains;
And in the end prevails as certain
As those that never trust to fortune,
To make their fear do execution
Beyond the stoutest resolution;
As earthquakes kill without a blow,
And, only trembling, overthrow.
If th' ancients crown'd their bravest men
That only sav'd a citizen,

What victory could e'er be won,
If ev'ry one would save but one?
Or fight endanger'd to be lost,
Where all resolve to save the most?
By this means, when a battle's won,
The war's as far from being done;
For those that save themselves, and ily,
Go halves, at least, i' th' victory;
And sometimes, when the loss is small,
And danger great, they challenge all;
Print new additions to their feats,
And emendations in gazettes;
And when, for furious haste to run,
They durst not stay to fire a gun,
Have don't with bonfires, and at home
Made squibs and crackers overcome;
To set the rabble on a flame,
And keep their governors from blame,
Disperse the news the pulpit tells,
Confirm'd with fire-works and with bells:
And tho' reduc'd to that extreme
They have been forc'd to sing Te Deum,
Yet with religious blasphemy,
By flatt'ring heaven with a lie,
And, for their beating, giving thanks,
They've rais'd recruits, and fill’d their banks :
For those who run from th' enemy
Engage them equally to fly;
And when the fight becomes a chace,

Those win the day that win the race. But it is time to have done; for to select all the beautiful passages of this inimitable poem, we should be obliged to transcribe almost the whole."

To most readers it is well known that tbe sentiment conveyed in the above memorable lines may be found in the verse made either by or for Demosthenes, as his best apology for running away at the battle of Chæronea, and leaving his shield behind him; and which sentiment subsequently was adopted by Aulus Gellius, Erasmus, Jeremy Taylor, and by the author of the Satyre Menippée, 1594.

Since the publication of Lowndes's Bibliographer's Manual in 1834, where it is stated that these lines occur in the Musarum Deliciæ, p. 101, ed. 1656, our literary antiquaries have comfortably consoled themselves with the idea that Sir John Mennis was the author of them; but although most of our public and private libraries have been carefully searched with the lantern of Diogenes, no copy as yet has been discovered containing them. To get over the difficulty, the editor of the new edition of Lowndes tells us (p. 1535) that “in some copies a cancelled leaf (reprinted in the new edition) is found, in which are the lines; " but he has not informed us that, during his long experience in literature, the original leaf had either been seen by himself or by any one else.

Goldsmith died in 1774, just ten years before

the inquiry was started respecting the origin of 4. The Puritan turned Jesuit. this familiar couplet. Great, indeed, would have

5. Zeal Examined. been the saving of ink and paper, not only in the

6. Persuasive to Moderation to Church Dissenters.

7. Account of the Bloodshed occasioned by the Jesuits. European and Gentleman's Niagazines, but in the

8. Sufferings of the Protestant Ministers in Hungary. Two Series of Notes and Queries, had poor Goldy 9. Lex Talionis. been permitted, in the visible order of things, to 10. Five Pence. have made one of the literary gathering at Brooks's

11. Marionis Enchiridion Loc. Com. Theol. Club, when doubtless he would have humbly

12. Mayerus de Vulneribus Ecclesiæ Romanæ.

13. Apuleius Castigated. confessed, that during a convenient temporary 14. La Sylvie Tragicum Pastorale [by Jean Mairet, seclusion with his friend Newbery in Canonbury 1621?] Tower he had unwittingly penned these celebrated 15. Les Bergeries de Maistre. lines, the authorship of which, for eighty long

16. Thorndike's Way of Composing Differences. years, has bamed the researches, and puzzled the With regard to the first, all I know is, that Leo, ingenuity of the whole literary brotherhood. or Leone, was an Italian Jew, a physician by pro

J. YEOWELI..

fession, who became a Christian, and published 4, Minerva Terrace, Barnsbury.

some mystical Dialogi di Amore at Rome in 1535, frequently reprinted and translated. His Life

must be a book of extreme rarity. Some writers ARCHBISHOP LEIGHTON'S LIBRARY AT DUN say that his real, or original, name was Rabbi Judah BLANE.

Abarbanel ; if so, probably a relative of the cele

brated R. Isaac Abarbanel, who died at Venice in On the 17th of last September I paid another

1508. Brunet, amongst others, calls him Abarvisit to Dunblane, and spent three weeks there,

banel. during which time I made a catalogue of Arch

No. 2 seems connected with the following pambishop Leighton's books, and took copious ex.

phlet: tracts from his fly-leaf memoranda. The catalogue

" Letters from Several Ministers in and about Edinis ready for the press, but I have given up the

burgh to the Ministers of London, concerning the Reintention intimated in a former paper (“N. & Q." establishing of the Covenant. Edinb. 1659,” 4to 3rd S. i. 6) of publishing it in a separate volume,

No. 4 is, no doubt, Dr. John Owen's treatise, as it seems more desirable to include it in my

The Puritan turned Jesuit, Lond. 1643, 4to. I forthcoming edition of the works. In the catalogue the lost books are denoted by italics, and

should be glad, however, to get some notion of every book containing any of Leighton's writing

the scope of this attack on his “Puritan" brethren is marked by an obelisk (t) prefixed, or by two

| by the great Independent divine?

One of Leighton's books is entitled Minus Celsus when there is much writing. A few illustrative

Senensis de Hereticis Capitali Supplicio non Affinotes are appended to the rarer and more remark

ciendis, s. I. 1584, 12mo. Is not the name fictitious, able books.

and was not this book really written by the celeI am happy to say that but one hundred of the

brated Hungarian Bishop, Andrew Dudith ? archbisbop's books have been lost, and these in

Did the great Port-Royalist, Antoine Arnauld, clude pamphlets and small works; besides, there

write La Tradition de l'Eglise touchant lEuchaare some twenty-four odd volumes missing. Of

ristie, 2 vols. 8vo, Paris, 1659 ? He did write these hundred works, but sixteen were lost during

a supplement to it, entitled Table Historique des the fifty years that elapsed between 1793 and

| ss. Pères, fc., dont les passages sont compris dans 1843, wben the two catalogues were respectively l'ouvrage intitulé, Tradition de l'Eglise sur l'Euprinted ; * and of the odd volumes but two, viz.

charistie. vols. iii. and vi. of S. Austin's Works. The

Leighton had a great reverence for one whose books of Leighton's library now extant number about 1230; of these, 206 contain his MS. notes

character and career in many respects strikingly

resembled his own, the pious Dom Barthelemy des and memorabilia.

Martyrs, Archbishop of Braga. He often recomThe following are some of the lost works, chiefly

mended the Stimulus Pastorum of the Portuguese pamphlets, which as yet I have not been able to

prelate, and used to lament that he never could identify in any bibliographical works within reach,

get a copy of the original Latin, but was obliged and therefore should be thankful for assistance:-

to be content with the French version, now in the 1. La Vita di Leo Hebr. 2. Warning anent the Re

library. Will some one kindly inform me respectg[sic. Re-establishing?] Scottish Discipline.

ing the first and chief subsequent editions of this 3. Confessions of the Protestant Divines concerning book so much prized by Leighton? The Vie de Episcopacy.

D. Barthelemy has been attributed to each of the • I am indebted to the kindness of Sir James Camp

celebrated brothers, Antoine and Louis Isaac Le bell, Bart., one of the Trustees, for a loan of the catalogue

Maistre, but is said to bave been really written by of 1793, perhaps the only existing copy.

Thomas Du Fossé. What is known of Du Fossé? .

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