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Hie therefore, Robin, overcast the night,
The starry welkin cover thou anon
With drooping fog, as black as Acheron.

Midsummer Night's Dream, A. 3, S. 2.
Dark night, that from the eye his function takes,
The ear more quick of apprehension makes;
Wherein it doch impair the feeing sense,
It pays the hearing double recompense.

Midsummer Night's Dream, A. 3, S. 2.

- I have intreated him along
With us to watch the minutes of this night:
That, if again this apparition come,
He may approve our eyes, and fpeak to it.

Hamlet, A. 1, S. 1.

Are you not he, , That fright the maidens of the villag’ry; And sometimes make the drink to bear no barm; Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?

Midsummer Night's Dream, A. 2, S. 1. I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows, Where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopy'd with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-rofes, and with eglantine : There fleeps Titania, some time of the night, Lull'd in thefe flowers with dances and delight.

Midsummer Night's Dream, A. 2, S. 2. True; When the day serves, before black-corner'd night, Find what thou want'st by free and offer'd light.

Timon of Athens, A. 5, S. 1. X 3

The

- approve our eyes.] Add a new testimony to that of our eyes.

JOHNSON. - Approve our eyes." Have proof that we were no way mistaken, that we have not been fanciful. He had said in the first line of the speech,-Horatio says, 'tis but our phantasy. A. B. . 2 When the day serves, before black-corner'd night.] We should read,

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If the midnight bell Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth, Sound on unto the drowsy race of night?.

King John, A. 3, S. 3: The time of night when Troy was set on fire; The time when scritch-owls cry, and ban-dogs howl?.

Henry VI. P. 2, A. I, S. 4. 3 Brief as the lightning in the colly'd night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,

And

. ? Sound on unto the drowsy race of night.] Some of the commentators have taken infinite pains to prove that the present reading, found on, is faulty, and that we ought to read, “ sound one,” &c. while the others have as Itoutly maintained that the text Thould undoubtedly remain unchanged. I am of opinion, however, that both these readings are wrong, and have therefore ventured to alter the paffage thus:

"

If the midnight bell ... “ Had, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth,

« Sounden unto the drowsy race of night.” To suppose that the king was unable to communicate his thoughts to Hubert, at any other time than when the bell was founding on, is truly ridiculous and absurd.. But that he should consider midnight as the proper season for conversing with him on the dreadful business in hand, is highly beautiful and just. He therefore says, if the bell bad founded, or founden, then, &c.

In old language, the participle is frequently formed by the terinination én, as it is now by ed.

A. B. 2- ban-dogs howl.] The etymology of the word bandogs is unsettled. They feem, however, to have been designed bý poets to signify some terrific beings, whose office it was to make night hideous, like those mentioned in the first book of Horace:

« Serpentes, atque videres “ Infernos errare danes."

STEEVENS. “ Ban-dog," or band-dog, is a dog kept in bands, or tied up. A maftiff.

A. B. . :3 Brief as the lightning in the collied night,

That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,
And ere a man bath power to say,-behold!

The jaws of darknefs do devour it up.] Though the word Spleen be here employed oddly enough, yet I believe it

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