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M A L I ÇE. Kneel not to me: The power that I have on you, is to spare you: The malice towards you, to forgive you; live, And deal with others better. Cymbeline, A. 5, S. 5. Fie, uncle Beaufort ! I have heard you preach, That malice was a great and grievqus sin:

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And will not you maintain the thing you teach,
But prove a chief offender in the saine insich

c. Henry VI. P. 1. A. 3, S. 1.

Μ Α Ν.

Espous'd to death, with blood he feald
Ą testament of noble-ending love.
The pretty and sweet manner of it forc'd .
Those waters from me, which I would have
But I had not so much of man in me,
But all my mother came into mine eyes,
And gave me up to tears. Henry V. A.

In such cases,
Men's natures wrangle with inferior things,
Though great ones are their object. 'Tis ev'n so,
For let our finger ach, and it endues
Our other healthful members, ev'n to a sense
Of pain'.

Othello, A. 3, S. 4. Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men. Put out the light, and then-Put out the lig If I quench thee, thou flaming minister, I can again thy former light restore Should I repent me :--but once put out thy light, Thou cunning st pattern of excelling nature, I know not where is that Promethean heat, That can thy light relumine. . Othello, A. 5, S. 2: Bring me unto my trial when you will. Dy'd he not in his bed? where should he die?

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Can I make men live, whe'r they will or no
Oh! torture me no more, I will confess. -

Henry VI. P. 2, A. 3, S. 3, Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice : his reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff ; you shall seek all day ere you find them; and, when you have them, they are not worth the search.'

Merchant of Venice, A. I, S. 1. If to do, were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages, prince's palaces.

Merchant of Venice, A. 1, S. 2. The painting is almost the natural man: For since dishonour trafficks with man's nature, He is but outside : these pencil'd figures are Even such as they give out.

Timon of Athens, A. 1, S. 1. A barren-fpirited fellow, one that feeds Bree! On objects, arts, and imitations ; Which, out of use, and stal'd by other men, Begin his fashion: do not talk of him, But as a property. Julius Cæsar, A. 4, S. 1.

Selv om Oh, what may man within him hide, Though angel on the outward fide! Do 10

i Measure for Measure, A. 3, S. 2.

- Dishonest wretch ! BWI Wilt thou be made a man out of my vice? To

Bild web Meafure for Measure, A. 3, S. I.' v

When inaidens fue, llwydd Men give like gods.

°Measure for Measure, A. 1, S. 5. Could great men thunder As Jove himself does, Jove would ne'er be quiet,

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