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SE? JAMES'S HALL

REGENT STREET AND PICCADILLY. MONDAY POPULAR CONCERTS.

LAST TWO CONCERTS OF THE SEASON.

Principal Performers., Pianoforte - Miss ARABELLA GODDARD and Mr. CHARLES HALLE.

Violin – M. SAINTON and Herr BECKER. Viola - Mr. DOYLE. Violoncello - Signor PIATTI. Vocalists - Mad. de PAEZ, Mad. LAURA BAXTER, Herr HERMANNS,

Mr. SANTLEY, and Mr. SIMS REEVES.

Conductor - Mr. BENEDICT.

UNDER TIIB MOST DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OF
HER MOST GRACIOU3 MAJESTY THE QUEEN,

U.R.H, THE PRINCE CONSORT,
THEIR ROYAL HIGUNBSSES THE PRINCESSES AND PRINCES OF THE

ROYAL FAMILY,
The Most Worshipful the Grand Master of Ireland,

His Grace the DUKE of LEINSTER,
Ant several other Distinguished Freemasons ;
His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the

EARL of EGLINTON and WINTON,

The LORD BISHOP OF MANCHESTER,
The Right Worshipful the Mayor of Manchester, IVIE MACKIE, E

His Worship the Mayor of Salford, W. HARVEY, Esq.
SIR FREDERICK GORR OUSELEY, Bart., Director of Nusic at the

University of Oxford.
And many of the Nobility, Gentry, Clergy, and Distinguished Families of the Empår.

MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 25, MO Z ART NI G H T.

MONDAY EVENING, JOLY 2, (The Directors' Benefit), the Programme will be selected from the Works of

DR. MARK'S GREAT NATIONAL ENTERPRISE

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ALL THE GREAT MASTERS

On MONDAY EVENING, JUNE 25, 1560,
TWENTY-SIXTH CONCERT OF THE SEASO.x,
MOZART NIGHT.'

Part 1.
Onintet, in A. for Clarinet and Stringed Instrumentsbynnanimons desir-) Mozart
Mr. LAZARUS, Herr BECKER, Herr RIES, Mr. DOYLE, and Signor PIATTI.
Song, “L’Addio".....Mad LAURA BAXTER".

....... Mozart Air, “ Non temer” cread. DE PAEZ.

............... Mozart Violin obligato, Herr BECKER. Song, “ Dalla sua pace”.......

Mozart ***Mr. Sins Reeves. Pianoforte alone (first time) .....

Mozart Miss ARABELLA GODDARD.

Part 11. Sonata, in F, with Variations for Pianoforte and Violin ................ Mozart

Miss ARABELLA GODDARD and Herr BECKER. Song, “ Deh per questo ........................

Mozart 0" "Mr.sius Reeves.** n diesen heil'ger

...... (Die Zauberflöte).......... Mozart

Herr HERRMANNS. Song, “ Voi che sapete” .....

... Mozart

DE PAEZ. Quartet, in G, No. 1 .....

... Mozart Herr BÉCKER, Herr RIES, Mr. DOYLE, and Signor PIATTI.

Organised in 1848, and developed at THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC,
BRIDGE STREET, MANCHESTER, established by him expressly as a Great
National lostitution to facilitate the Encouragement and Promotion of NATIVE
MUSICAL TALENT, and the GENERAL ADVANCEMENT OF MUSIC
AMONG THE RISING GENERATION, upon his new and effective system,
also as a NORMAL SCHOOL, for the training of masters to conduct CoXSERVATOIRES
op Music to be established throughout the United Kingdom, for LITTLE CHILDREN.
the whole comprising an entirely new scheme of NATIONAL EDUCATION, by
blending music with general instruction, so that the study of music shatt become a
branch of education in the humblest of schools of this country. To illustrate and to
rouse an interest in every town and city for these institutions, Dr. Mark travels with
a number of his pupils occasionally through the country-giving lectures, and intro.
ducing bis highly approved and pleasing Musical Entertainment, entitled DR. MARK
AND HIS LITTLE MEN, who number upwards of Thirty Instrumentalists, and a
most Efficient Chorus, the whole forining a most unique and complete Juvenile
Orchestra, composed of LITTLE ENGLISH, TRISH, SCOTCH AND WELCH
BOYS, FROM FIVE TO SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE, who play Operatic Selec-
tions, Solos, Marches, Quadrilles, Galops, &c., and sing Songs and Choruses in a most
effective manner, and to whom Dr. Mark gives a gratuitous General and Musical
Education,
APPOINTMENTS OF MASTERS AND ARRANGEMENTS OF CLASSES IN

THE ABOVE INSTITUTION.
Principal of the Royal College of Music ; Director, Composer, and

Conductor; Lecturer to both Private and Public, Theoretical Dr. MARK.

and Practical Instrumental and Vocal Classes ... Master of the General Educational Department ;)

Mr. POWELL
Writing, Reading, Arithmetic, Grammar, Dictation,

and Two
History, Geography, Practical Geometry, and Book-

Assistant Teachers, keeping ... ... *** ** * . .. ... )

PRACTICAL ASSISTANT TEACHERS. Organ ... . .. ... **

... Mr. BAKER.

S Herr SIEMERS. Pianoforte...... ... ... ... ... ...

Mr. ELDER.

Mons. ROGUIER. Violin ... ... .. . ... ... ... ... ...

Mr. BEARD.

Š Mons. VIEUXTEMPS. Violoncello, Double Bass, and Viola...

Mr. T. DONOVAN. Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, and Clarionet ...

Sig. CORTESI. Cornet and other Brass Instruments ...

Mr. H. ROSSELL. Concertina (German and English)

Mr. ELDER,

Messrs. Powell and Vocal Classes .. .... .

ELDER. Dr, MARK has also made provision for the Orphans of the Musical Profession pos. sessing musical talent, who will find the above institution a happy home, and receive a most effective general and musical education, board, and clothing, free of all expense.

* Little Boys, from five to nine years of age, apprenticed for three, fire, or seven years by paying a moderate entrance fee to cover the expenses of instrument and books.

Twelve appointments ready for Masters. For Prospectuses, apply direct to the Royal College of Music, Bridge Street, Manchester.

Dr. MARK is also open to Engagements with his little Men.

Dr. MARK begs to invite the Parents and Friends, and all those interested in his Enterprise and in the Education of the Youths of this country, to visit his establish ment. Visiting hours:- From Nine to Eleven, a.m., and Two and Four, p.m. Saturdays and Sundays excepted.

OP

On MONDAY EVENING, JULY 2, 1860,
TWENTY-SEVENTH CONCERT OF THE SEASON, TUE PROORAMME WILL BE

SELBCTED FROM THE WORKS OF
ALL THE GREAT MASTERS.

Part I.
Quartet, in C major (first time)..
M.'SAINTON, Herr GOFFRIE, Mr. Doyle, and Signor PIATTI.

::: :::.......:::: : Spokr Song, " The Wanderer" ..

S ciej....................... Schubert Harpsichord Lessons (by desire).....

... Scarlatti Mr. CHARLES HALLÈ: Lieder Kreis (hy desire).......

..... Beethoven Mr. SIMS REEVES, accompanied on the Pianoforte by Mr. CH. S. HALLE. Prelude, Sarabande, and Gavotte (by desire) ..

.. Bach Violoncello, Sig. PLATTT'; uccompanied on the Pianoforte by Mr. BENEDICT.

Part II. Quartet, in E flat major, Op. 44 ..

.... Jendelssohn M.'SAINTON, Herr GOFFRIE, Mr. DOYLE, and Signor PIATTI. Song, "May"

.......... Neverbeer Mr. SIMS REEVES. Suite de Pieces, in E major, Pianoforte alone, concluding with "The Harmonious Blacksmith” (by desire) Miss ARABELLA GODDARD.

..... Handel Song," Il pensier” .. "Mr. SANTLEY.

........... Haydn song, "La Gita in Gondola”

............ Rossini Mr. SIMS REEVES. Duet, for Two Pianofortes, in D major (first time).

...... Mozart Mr. CHARLES HALLE and Miss ARABELLA GODDARD.

CANTERBURY HALL CONCERTS.-Westminster

Road..Lessee, Mr. C. MORTON.-Every Evening.-C. H. Gounod's Opera, Faust-Faust. Mr. HENRY HERBERT; Mephistopheles, Mr. C. BERNARD ; Siobel, Mrs. ANDERSON ; Marguerite, Miss Russel. Conductor, Herr JONGHMANS-and Selections from Dinorah, Trovatore, and Macbcth. Several interesting Pictures have been added to the Fine Arts Gallery. The suite of Halls have been re-decorated and beautified, and constitute one of the most unique and brilliant sights of the metropolis.

DOUBLE BASSES for sale, six fine-toned Instruments

by good Makers; a VIOLONCELLO by Banks, in Case; TENORS by Foster and Fendt; VIOLINS by Straduarius, Guarnerius, Steiner &c. ; also a self-acting ORGAN. in a Carved Mahogany Case, play3 74 tunes. For Particulars apply to J. Moore, Buxton Road, Huddersõeld..',

Conductor :- MR. BENEDICT.

Printed by GEORGE ANDREW SPOTTISWOODE, of No. 10 Little New Street, in the Parish of St. Bride, in the City of London, at No. 5 New-street Square, in the said Parish.

Published by Jony BOOSET, at the Office of BOOSEY R Sons, 28 Holles Street, Saturday, June 23, 1860.

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"the Worth Of Abt Appears Most Eminent In Music, Since It Requires No Material, No Subject-matter, Whose

E Deducted: It Is Wholly Form And Power, And It Raises And Ennobles Whatever Ft Expresses"Odtke

SUBSCRIPTION—Stamped for Postage—20s. PER ANNUM Payable in advance by Cash or Post-Office Order to B00SEY & SONS, 28 Holies Street, Cavendish Square, London, W.

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CEYSTAL PALACE. —GREAT NATIONAL BRASS BAND CONTEST—On Tuesday, 10th. and Wednesday, IIth July. Arrangements have been made Tor a Grand Monster Bruit Band Contest on the abo*e dart, In which upwards of ONE HUNDRED BANDS from all parts of England .ire engaged to take part. Valuable Prizes, in money and cups, will be gl^en r. the Company ; and, in addition, the principal Musical Instrument Makers in L. ndon hare signt6«*d their Intention to present several first-class instruments as special prizes. The contest will commence each day at Ten o'clock, and on both days the whole of the Bands will meet at Three o'clock precisely In the Handel Orchestra, and perform Mendelssohn's "Wedding March;" Haydn's Chortis, " The Heavens are Telling;" Handel's "Hallelujah," '* Rule Britannia," and ** God Save the Queen." A Monster Gong Drum, seven feet in diameter manufactured expressly for the occasion, will accompany the combined bands.—Admission, Tuesday, Ss. fid.; Wednesday la.

Notice.—Excursion Trains will run from all the principal Towns on the Midland, London and North*Western, Great Northern, South-Western, and other Railways.— Further particulars will be duly announced.

PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY—The Directors respectfully announce that the SIXTH and LAST CONCERT will take place at the Hanover Square Rooms, on Mondiiy Evening next, July 2. Programme, Sinfonta in D, No. 1, Moiart; Concerto, pianoforte, in E lint, Miss Arabella Godoard, Dussek; Overture, Naiades, Sterndale Bennett: Sinfonla in C minor, No. 5, Beethoven; Concertino, flute, in B roini>r.(MS.), C. KopPtTZ, Koppiti; Overture, Jubilee, Weber. Vocal performer, Miss Louisa Pynb. Conductor, Professor Stermoale Brnnett, Mus.D. To begin at Eight o'clock. Tickets, 10s. each, to be had of Messrs. Addison, H oilier, & Lucas, 210 Regent Street.

MISS STEELE begs to announce that her EVENING CONCERT will take place at the Hanover Square Rooms, on Tuesday next, July 3. to commence at half-past Eight o'clock. Art'stes, Mads. Parepa, Sieflk, Annie Elliott, and Palmkr; Messrs. Sims Rerveh, Dfpret, Santi Ev, Charles S\mman,

Deichsiann, Lidei., Drew Dean, W. G. Cdbins, And Cunio Reserved Seats, 10s. 6d.

each, to be had or.lr of Miss Steele, 10S Marylebone Road; Tickets, 7s., of Messrs. Addiion, Leader & Ollivier, and Miss Steele.

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R. GEORGE RUSSELL has the honour to announce

. _ that he will give a SOIREE MUSICALE at Willis's Rooms, on Wednesday next, July 4th, at hidfpa;t Eight. '.Vocalists, — Miss Augusta Thomson, Mad. Sai!rro*i-D"LBYl Mr Whiffin, and Mr. Santley. Instrumentalists,—Pianoforte, Mr. George RrssBLL; Violin, Herr C/ Rl Deichmann; Viola, Mr. Richard Blagrove; Violoncello, M. Paqub; Concertina, Mr. Richard Blagruvr; Harmonium, Mr. F. Scutrom Clark. Conductors, Mr. Cusins and Mr. Hakolu Thomas. Stalls, 10s. Cd., tickets, 7s., may be had at the principal Music-sellers*; and of Mr. George Russell, High Street. Croydon.

"Vf AD. LOUISA VINNING'S MATINEE MUSI

Jj-L CALK, on Thursday, the 5th July, nt half-past Two o'clock (by kind prrmifiiorj), at Messrs. Collard and Collard's, IG Grosvrnor Street, under th- immediate patronage of their Roval Highnesses the Duchess of Cambridge and the Princess Mary. Vocalists, Miles. Par'ep*. Avgcsta Thompson, Mesriaroes Lai'iu Baxter and Lot'lttA Vinmng. Messrs. Wihye Co<>i>e«, Pcrkiss, Dspeet. and Santley. Insttnmentsttsu: Pianoforte. Mile. Hkmmky and W. G. CuaiKSi Violin, H. Blagrove; Flute, R. S Prat-ten ; Violoncello, Signor Pezze J Guitar, Mad. R. S. PratiEn. Conductors, Francesco Bt-ROER an I Signor Ccnio. Reserved Scats, 10s. 6d.; Unreserved, 7s. Cd.; to be obtained or Mr. R. Ollivier. 19 Old Bond Street, and the Principal Music Sellers; and of Mad. Louisa Vinning, 13 Hanover Villas, Kotting Hill, W.

MR BLAGROVE'S FOURTH and LAST QUAETETT CONCERT (Professors' Concert Union), on Friday Evening. July 6ih, at Beethoven R omi. Performers Mad. Catherine Hayes. Mile. Marie Wieck, Messrs. H. Blagrove, Clbhenti, Renolb, John Hill, Colchester, Daudert, and Sidmby Smith.—Double Quartett, Spohr; Sonata, Beethoven; Solos, Songs, &c— Tickrts at Leader's, New Bond Street.

ELEANOR WARD has the honour to announce

that her FIRST EVENING CONCERT will take place at the Hanover Rooms, on Wednesday, July 11th. Vocalists: Mesdamcs Parepa, Lascelles. Ral; Messr*. Wilbye Cooper nnd Santlbt. Instrumentalists—Pianoforte: Eleanob Ward. Violin: Mr. Blagrove. Conductor: Mr. Benedict. fed Seats, 10s. Gd. ; Tickets, 7s., to be h;.d of Mr. Rob*. W. Ollivier, 19 Old Street, Piccadilly, W., and at the principal Music Warehouses.

Jvi that

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WORCESTER CATHEDRAL CHOIR.

AVACANCY has occurred in the TENOR Department of the above Choir, which it is proposed to fill up on Saturday, July 91st. Candidates are requested to forward their Testimonials as early as possible to the Rev. T. L. Wheeler, Bromwich House.Worcester, and to appear personally at the Cathedral at one o'clock on the above-named day. The stipend Is £6$ per annum.

There are also TWO VACANCIES amongst the CHORISTERS which It It prorosed to fill up at the samn time. The Choristers in addition to their Musical Training, will receive a first-clans Gratuitous Education at the College School.

ELY CATHEDRAL.-LAY-CLERKSHIP.

THERE is a VACANCY for an ALTO VOICE in the CHOIRof ELY CATHEDRAL. The emoluments average about £70 yearly. Attendance twice daily. The strictest testimonials as to character will be required, and must be forwarded, to the Precentor, the Rev. W. E. Dickson, College, Ely,on or before July 14th

The trial of voices will take place at Ely, on July 25th, when those candidates will be permitted to attend who receive an intimation to that effect from the Precentor.

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USICAL INSTRUMENTS for VOLUNTEER and

COUNTRY BANDS.-BOOSEY and SONS beg to state that they have made arrangements to supply BRASS and REED INSTRUMENTS, of the very beat description, at the lowest scale of prices. Band*Ma»ters and others are recommended to forward a list of Instruments required, for which they will receive an estimate of cost by return of post.

Boosey and Sons, Holies Street.

ORGAN, in richly Carved Case, 10 feet wide, 19 feet high, 7 feet deep, containing Open, Dulciana, Stopt, Principal, Harmonic Flute. Twelfth, Fifteenth, Mixture, and Cornopean; compass C C to F. Swill :—Tenor E to F, Double, Open, Stopt, Principal, Mixture. Horn, and Ob c. Pedal Bourdon, 29 Notes, 3 Composition Pedals.—Bryceson and Fincbam, Brook Street, N.W.

CHURCH ORGANS—Forster and Andrews, Organ Builders, Hull, have a number of SECOND-HAND ORGANS for tale, which they have taken In exchange, built by Bevinaton, the late J. C. Bishop, Lincoln, Parsons, Bryceson, Holdich, &c—For price and particulars, apply to Forster and Andrews, Organ Builders, Hull.

TROUBLE BASSES for sale, six fine-toned Instruments

XJ by good Makers; a VIOLONCELLO by Banks, in Case; TENORS by Foster and Fendt; VIOLINS by Straduarlus, Guarnerlus, Steiner &c.; also a self-acting ORGAN, in a Carved Mahogany Case, plays 7t tunes. For Particulars apply to J. Moore, Buxton Road, Huddersfield.

Just published, price 4s.I

RAMSGATE SANDS QUADRILLE A Comic and Characteristic Set on Popular Airs. By Bcrckhardt. Illustrated In colours by Brandard.

No. I. The Excursion Boat.
No. 2. The Promenade.
No. 3. The Bazaar.
No. 4. The Ride.
No. 6. Ramsgato Sands.
'. Boosey ft Sons, Holies Street.

ALFRED MELLON'S QUARTETT (No 2) in G Major, for Two Violins. Viola, and Violoncello, performed with great success at the Monday Popular Concerts, by Messrs. Sainton, Rlis, Doyle, and PlATTl, Is published by Addison, Hollier, and Lucas, 210 Regent Street, price 6s.

WORKS edited by J. W. DAVISON. Each with a Preface, in large volumes, music size. 1. DUSSF.K'S PLUS ULTRA and VYOKLFFL'S NE PLUS ULTRA SONATAS. In I vol.,witha Biography of each Author, price <s. S. CHOPIN'S MAZURKAS. Complete, with Portrait and Biography, price S 3. MENDELSSOHN'S SONGS WITHOUi' WORDS. Complete, with Poi and Preface, price 6s.; or in 4to. 7s. 6d. cloth.

Boosey and Sons, Holies Street.

CANTERBURY HALL CONCERTS.—W
noad_Le»sre. Mr. C. MORTON.—Every Evening,—C. H
Faust—Faust, Mr. Henry Herbert; Mephutbpbeles, Mr. C.
Mrs. Anderson ; Marguerite, Miss Ri'ssel. Conductor, Herr Jono:
tions from Dinorali, Trovatare, and Macbeth. Several interesting I
added to the Fine Arts Gallery. The suite of Halls have been .
beautified, and constitute one of the most unique and brilliant
metropolis.

5?*

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MESSRS. DUNCAN DAVISON & CO.'S

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

: PIANOFORTE.

UNDER THE MOST DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OF
HER MOST GRACIOU3 MAJESTY THE QUEEN

H.R.H. THE PRINCE CONSORT,
THEIR ROYAL HIGUNESSES THE PRINCESSES AND PRINCES OF THE

ROYAL FAMILY,
The Most Worshipful the Grand Master of Ireland,

His Grace the DUKE of LEINSTER,
And sercral other Distinguished Freemasons ;
His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the

EARL of EGLINTON and WINTON,

The LORD BISHOP OF MANCHESTER,
The Right Worshipful the Mayor of Manchester, IVIE MACKIE, Esq.

His Worship the Mayor of Salford, W. HARVEY, Esq.
SIR FREDERICK GORE OUSELEY, Bart., Director of Music at the

University of Oxford.
And many of the Nobility, Gentry, Clergy, and Distinguished Families of the Empire.

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DR. MARK'S GREAT NATIONAL ENTERPRISE

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Brissac, Jules .......... " BELLA ADORATA,” Morceau de boudoir ...
Dichl, Louis ......... “REINDEER GALOP" ... ... .
Dawes, Albert ....... “AULD LANG SYNE,” with Variations

Ditto .................. “SOUTHDOWN POLKA". ...
Guenée, Li ......... « LA CHASSE,” Morceau de Salon ... ...
Greville, Hon. Mrs. “BALLABILE MILITARE” ... ... ...
Ilolmes, W. H. ...... “HIGHLAND ECHO" ... ... ... ...

Ditto ............... " INSPIRATION," by Wolff (Selections, No. 1)

Ditto ................ “ GAIETY," by Handel (Selections, No. 2) ... 10 Holmes, Miss G. ... “ AIR,” with Variations ... ... ... ...

Ditto ............... “ LES ETOILES ET LEUR LANGAGE"
Harvey, R, F......... " PENSEZ A MOI," Reverie ... ...
Monreal, G............ " LA DIVINA MELODIA," Nocturne ...
Mornot, Eugène...... “A SUMMER'S DAY” . .
Ditto ................. “A SUMMER'S EVE” ...

26 Mc Korkell, C. ...... “MARCH” ... ... ...

30 Pech, James ........ “MAYDE W POLKA” ... Richards, Brinley ... “LEOPOLD MAZURKA" Ditto ................. “ETHEL,” Romance ... ... ...

20 Scarlatte, D. ........ “FUGUE in G MINOR,” from his Harpsichord

Lessons, as played by Miss Arabella Goddard! ... 26

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Organised in 1848, and developed at THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC,
BRIDGE STREET, MANCHESTER, established by him expressly as a Great
National Institution to facilitate the Encouragement and Promotion of NATIVE
MUSICAL TALENT, and the GENERAL ADVANCEMENT OF MUSIC
AMONG THE RISING GENERATION, upon his new and effective system,
also as a NORMAL SCHOOL, for the training of masters to conduct CONSERVATOIRES
OF Music to be established throughout the United Kingdom, for Little CHILDREX.
the whole comprising an entirely new scheme of NATIONAL EDUCATION, by
blending music with general instruction, so that the study of music shall become a
branch of education in the humblest of schools of this country. To illustrate and to
rouse an interest in every town and city for these institutions, Dr Mark travels with
a number of his pupils occasionally through the country--giving lectures, and intro-
ducing his highly approved and pleasing Musical Entertainment, entitled DR. MARK
AND HIS LITTLE MEN, who number upwards of Thirty Instrumentalists, and a
most Efficient Chorus, the whole forming a most unique and complete Juvenile
Orchestra, composed of LITTLE ENGLISU, IRISH, SCOTCH AND WELCH
BOYS, FROM FIVE TO SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE, who play Operatic Selec-
tions, Solos, Marches, Quadrilles, Galops, &c., and sing Songs and Choruses in a most
effective manner, and to whom Dr. Mark gives a gratuitous General and Musical
Education.
APPOINTMENTS OF MASTERS AND ARRANGEMENTS OF CLASSES ÍN

THE ABOVE INSTITUTION.
Principal of the Royal College of Music ; Director, Composer, and )

Conductor; Lecturer to both Private and Public, Theoretical Dr. MARK,

and Practical Instrumental and Vocal Classes ... ... ... ... ...) Master of the Genral Educational Department :

Mr. POWELL
Writing, Reading, Arithmetic, Grammar, Dictation,

and Two
History, Geography, Practical Geometry, and Book?

Assistant Teachers.

A
keeping ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... )

PRACTICAL ASSISTANT TEACHERS.
Organ!... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Mr. Baker.

Herr SIEMERS.
Pianoforte

*Mr. ELDER.

(Mons. ROGUIER, Violin ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

Mr. BEARD.

S Mons. VIEUXTEMPS. Violoncello, Double Bass, and Viola...

**Mr. T. DONOVAN. Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, and Clarionet ...

Sig. CORTESI. Cornet and other Brass Instruments ..

Mr. H. RusseLL. Concertina (German and English) ..

Mr. ELDER.

Messrs. POWELL and Vocal Classes ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... "

ELDER. Dr. MARK has also inade provision for the Orphans of the Musical Profession pos. sessing musical talent, who will find the above institution a happy home, and receive a most effective general and musical education, board, and clothing, free of all

VOCAL.

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Allen, G. B............. " THE MEADOW GATE"
Aguilar, E. ........... " SYMPATHY” ... ... ... ...
Baker, H....... " THE STEPPING STONES"... ...
Balse, M, W. ......... “I LOVE YOU” ... ... ...

Ditto ................ " I'M NOT IN LOVE, REMEMBEN!" ... ...
Ditto ................. “ OH, TAKE ME TO THY HEART AGAIN” ...
Cobham, M............. “AWAKE, LITTLE PILGRIM,” Sacred Song .
Foster, Alice ....... “ MERRILY, MERRILY SHINES THE MORN”...
Ferrari, A. ............ “ EIGHT BALLADS,” Nos. I to 8, each ... ...
Lütz, W. Meyer ... “UNDER TITEI

" UNDER TIIE LINDEN TREE” Ditto .................. “ MERRY LITTLE MAUD" ... ... ... ... Meyerbeer, G.......... “ ASPIRATION," Cantique for Six Voices, and Bass

Solo ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Macfarren, G. A. ... “ THREE FOUR-PART SONGS," for Male Voices,

each ... ... ... ... ... .. 21 and McKorkell, C. ..... “FLOWERS, LOVELY FLOWERS” ... Mori, Frank............ “ WERT THOU MINE” ... ... ... Osborne, G. A. ...... “ THE DEW DROP AND THE ROSE” Reichardt, A. ........ “GOOD NIGHT" (Wiegenlied).. ... Richards, Brinley ... “THE SULIOTE WAR SONG” ...

Ditto .................. “THE HARP OF WALES" ... ...

Ditto .................. • THE BLIND MAN AND SUMMER” Stirling, Elizabeth... “LEONORA" ... ... . .. ... ... Schloesser, A......... “I WOULD I WERE A BUTTERFLY” ... ...

Little Bys, from five to nine years of age, apprenticed for three, fise, or seren years by paying a moderate entrance fee to cover the expenses of instrument and books.

Twelve appointments ready for Masters. For Prospectuses, apply direct to the Royal College of Music, Bridge Street, Manchester

Dr. MARK is also open to Engagements with his little Men.

Dr. MARK begs to invite the Parents and Friends, and all those interested in his Enterprise and in the Education of the Youths of this country, to visit his establishment. Visiting hours:- From Nine to Eleven, a.m., and Two and Four, p.m. Saturdays and Sundays excepted.

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NEW SONGS by J. W. DAVISON, “Rough wind

that moanest lond" (sung by Mr. Santley at the Monday Popular Concerts); " Swifter far than Summer's flight," (sung hy Miss Palmer at the Monday Popular Concerts); “False friend, wilt thou smile or weep," Beatrice's song in the Cenci (sung by Madame Sainton-Dolby, at the Monday Popular Concerts, St. James's Hall); are published by Cramer, Beale, and Co., 201 Regent Street.

The above Songs form Nos. 1, 2, and 3 of Vocal Illustrations of Shelley.

"Mr. Santley was encored in one of the thoroughly picturesque and poetical settings of Sheiler, by Mr. J. W. Davison, mentioned a week or two since. His song, Rough wind that moanest loud,' is a thoroughly good song."- Atheneum,

"Madame Sainton-Dolby's greatest efforts were called forth by Mendelssohn's • Night' song, and Mr. J. W. Davison's · False friend, wilt thou smile or wrep' (from Shelley's Cenci'), to both of which she did the amplest justice. The latter work is one of the most poetical and beautiful of the 'Vocal Illustrations of Shelley,' composed by Mr. Davison many years ago, and which, though rarely heard, possess far more sterling merit than nine-tenths of The most admired songs of the day. A more intel. lectual treatment of the words could not well be imagined. Mr. Davison has com. pletely caught the spirit of the poetry, and heightened its beauty by the potent charms which belong only to the sister'art. False friend, wilt thou smile or weep,' sung to perfection by Madame Sainton-Dolby, was enthusiastically applauded."

Morning Post, April 26, 1860. Cramer, Beale, and Chappell, 201 Regent Street.

London: DUNCAN DAVISON and Co. 244 Regent Street, South Corner of

Little Argyll Street.

Dépôt Général de la Maison Brandus de Paris."

THE DEFINITION AND DESCRIPTION OF THE
ORGAN.

WITII SOME ACCOUNT OF ITS MECHANISM.*

The Organ is a wind instrument, with a key-board, the sounds of which are fixed, but capable of being sustained at the will of the player, especially consecrated to the service of the Church.

This definition makes the organ liable to all that may be expected of it by the laws both of art and religion.

On first looking at its case exteriorly, we are struck more especially with three things: with the immense size of its pipes in front, which we take to be the most powerful in the instrument, though they are, on the contrary, the least so; with the key-boards, which, though we should hardly have thought it perhaps, were we to put down the keys, would at once give utterance to those great pipes; and with a quantity of knobs or handles, which stand out from the case of the organ on two sides of the key-board, and carrying, each of them, the name of some instrument, such as the flute", the viol da garaba, the trumpet, and the like. But nothing of all this acts or speaks alone, for in order to this various parts of the organ must be joined together, and all these various parts do not at once meet the eye.

The organ has no voice, but by means of the wind inhaled by the bellows, and these are placed as near the main body of the instrument as possible, in order that they may send the wind the more directly into the pipes which rest upon it. Herein we may compare the instrument to a man, who would not be able to make himself understood without inhaling the air, which, after it has i been equally distributed throughout his lungs, is driven out by them again through the vocal passages. The bellows, with its i feeders, is as much the chest to the organ as the lungs are to the human frame. Put in motion by the blower, they fill themselves one after the othcr,f and are emptied into a common channel placed near their extremity, and this is called the main wind trunk.

From this main channel other wind trunks branch off, as branches from the same common root, and carry the source of its sound into all parts of the instrument, as the branches of the tree carry the sap, or rather, as we have taken the human frame for our analogy, these smaller wind trunks are as the arteries, which, by means of the heaven-sprung system of the circulation, carry on the blood, which is pumped forth by the heart, throughout the whole of the hody. The wind thus conveyed by one or many channels, gathers itself together and is compressed in a sort of chest or large hollow table, on which the pipes of the organ are placed, and is called the sound-board. The interior of the soundboard is but li ttle less complicated than the vocal organ of the human body. It is from them that the compressed air has to escape by the pallets, and so to be transformed into distinct and varied sounds' in the hundreds of pipes which bristle on the sutface of the sound-board. This wind box, this transformer of the compressed air into sound, i», as it were, the centre of all the mechanical parts of the instrument, which are necessary for the production of sound; the place where they all meet together, and to which they all tend, ana hence, perhaps, its name of sound-board. Here it is that we find out if the bellows are weak or strong, if the hand of the organist touches the keys with or without effect, if the pallets on being opened cause an harmonious sound, or merely a disagreeable cyphering, and thus the sound-board becomes the centre of all that is good or bad in the organ; it is, to continue our analogy taken from the human frame, as the heart, to which all the system of the circulation of tlic blood flows as to a centre; and as the throat, from whence proceeds the word, expressive of the inward soul.

But how is: this mechanical contrivance, this magic air-transformer, to be itself made to act, for though we should fill all the •ound-boards imaginable with wind, this alone would not be sufficient to create a sound, still less an harmonious sound. The instrument just turned out from the hands of the builder, and

* From L'Orgue, sa connaissance, son administration, et son jeu, by Joseph Rcgnier. Fourth Study.

t Note of Translator.—This refers to the more common way of making organ bellows in France, which is more old-fashioned than the English way.

supplied with wind by the action of the bellows, is still only a dumb instrument. The mysterious power of giving speech to the organ is to be found in the organist, who after a preliminary operation, of which we will speak presently, places his hands upon the clavier or key-board, the true key to his mysterious power, as its Latin root clavis indicates, and it is then only that the instrument ceases to be dumb, and sings in accents of joy or sadness according to the genius of the man, of whom it may be said to be both slave and master.

Three things then concur for making the organ speak; a bellows, which may be called the starting point; the pipes, which are placed upon the sound-board, and may be called the end; and thirdly, the hands of the organist, which may be called the means, for it is to them that all the mechanism of the organ from the clavier to the sound-board is subject, and it is by their means that the passages for the air, which supplies the pipes, are opened or shut as the organist pleases.

Since the most interesting details of all this mechanism meet in the sound-board, as in a centre, we will briefly analyse its form and action. In doing this, we do not intend to give a formal list of its many component parts, but simply to give such a general account of them as may be sufficient for our present purpose. In building, especially, we want to see a great deal, to know but little.

The sound-board then, as we have already said, may be described as a long, square-cornered chest, six or eight inches in depth, the upper-board of which is pierced with as many holes as there are pipes to be placed in order, as an harmonious forest of trees, upon its surface. All the pipes which emit the same quality of tone are planted together in n straight line in the same row, and each row of pipes of the same quality of tone is called a stop. The hole in the foot of each pipe is in communication with the interior of the sound-board, but is separated from the wind by two obstacles, viz., a register and a pallet.

The register is a rule of wood, placed within the sound-board, exactly under the feet of the pipes, and sliding horizontally backwards and forwards, in a groove, as completely air-tight ns it is smooth and even. This rule, so-called because it rules or directs the action of the wind, is itself pierced with holes exactly corresponding with those in the upper-board of the sound-board for the feet of the pipes, in such way that, as the rule is moved, the holes in the feet of the pipes and those of the rules are perpendicular or set the one to the other. When they are perpendicular to one another, the ruler, far from being an obstacle to the entrance of the wind into the pipes, is, on the contrary, its conductor, for then the foot of the pipes, by which the wind enters, is in immediate communication with the interior of the soundboard.

We will suppose, then, that the organist wishes to make that quality of sound or that stop which represents the trumpet heard throughout the extent of the key-board. Before putting his hands on the key-board, he places it on one of those knobs, which stand out from the case of the organ, which serve as places for inscribing the names of the registers, and, in this instance, he places it on that one of them which is labelled trumpet, and draws it out. No sooner has he done so than the wind before shut up within the soundboard, so far as this obstacle is concerned, is at once enabled to be in direct communication with the pipes of the quality of tone required, and the preliminary operation is thus far completed. The organist repeats this action for all the registers of which he intends to compose his orchestra. Thus, if he wishes it to be conposed of a bourdon and flute, as well as the trumpet, he draws the knobs which answer to those registers; if only two of those registers, he pushes in one of the three, and so of the rest.

But the second obstacle has still to be removed; the pallet must be made to open. The pallet may be described as a little door on a spring, occupying a lower region in the sound-board, a region which may be very properly called that of storms, inasmuch as a certain amount of force is required to overcome the resistance of the wind which rushes headlong from the action of the bellows into the space opened by the gaping of the pallet, and called a groove. The pallet is connected with the key by means of a tracker, which is sometimes of very considerable length, but however far removed the pallet may be from the key-board by the tracker, it is affected by the slightest action on the key, and that

with greater rapidity according to the greater perfection of the; mechanism.

There are aa many pallets as grooves, as many pallets and grooves as keys, and often more pallets and grooves than keys for the bass notes, which being composed of larger pipes, require more wind, and consequently more openings by which to inhale it.

The bellows then being filled, and the registers drawn, as many notes will speak on the sound-board as there are keys put down by the fingers of the organist, for the wind must then of necessity pass from the sound-board to the pipes of which the registers and pallets are open, and is thus transformed, or becomes sonorous in accordance with a law of accoustics, which we shall have to consider later on Hence, before touching the key-board, the

organist must always draw tie registers, for if he did not do so, the keys would no doubt open a passage for the wind, but this wind would only strike against the roof formed by that part of the sound-board which is full of registers, without being able to transform itself into vibrating columns of air in the bodies of the pipes. 5.

But in an instrument so vast as an organ, there Is but one sound-board and but one key-board. The organ has but one soul, it is true, but this one soul animates several bodies. There are, in consequence, as many keyboards as there are principal separate parts in an organ, but experience and the requirements of art have for the most part limited them to three or four at most.

Often an organ limited in extent from want of means or-space, has but one principal part, but one body: when this is not the case, and it has more than one such part, that part which is the most largely developed and speaks the loudest, is called the great-organ. Immediately below this, as regards its power and volume of Bound, is placed the choir-organ; whfle the swell-organ takes tip an intermediate position between these two principal parts, and 13 destined to give effect to those phrases of music which require a more delicate and special handling, and for which the choir-organ supplies the proper accompaniment. Last of all conies the echo-organ*, emitting veiled and smothered sounds, as its name implies, though it must be confessed it docs so more in name than in reality.

These different parts of the organ may be all enclosed within the case, including the choir-organ, though this ia very commonly placed in a case apart by itself, and brought in front of the greatorgan, so as, in appearance, to form an organ in miniature. It was so placed, almost without exception, in the older organs. All the keyboards, not excepting that of the choir, are placed in steps one above another, the first and lowest that of the choir, next above this that of the great-organ, above this again that of the swell, and at the top of all that of the echo-organ.

We have said nothing as yet of a key-board which is placed on the floor at the feet of the organist, and forms quite a peculiar feature in his art. This is the pedal-organ, the keys of which are long and short like those of the manual, and have under their control a special sound-board of their own, which carries the pipes which emit the gravest sounds of the instrument. Without the pedal the concert of the organ is incomplete; with it the organist is possessed of a powerful foundation bass, but such that he may even raise it to the dignity of a solo instrument, by causing it to take an independent and special part of its own, a part, however, which should be always more or less grave and dignified in its character, enriched with passages of energy and rapidity according to the skill of the organist.

Seated then in front of these different key-boards, between the organ and the altar, the organist may be compared to the helmsman placed between the rudder and the masts of the ship, attentive alike to the signals of the captain and the motions of the waves. In his case it is the mighty flood of the peoples' son" that the organist sustains with the majesty of his chords, while nis signals come to him from the sanctuary, the ceremonies of which he follows, and by means of a mirror placed obliquely, he may even turn his back on the altar, as in the ancient organs, see all that is done there as it were before his face, and join his intention with that of the priest who offers the divine mysteries.

• Note of Translator.—This last is not found in English organs as at present constructed. In its place is fonnd now either a solo, or what Mr. Hill has called a combination-organ in the Birmingham Town Hall Organ.

fetter to % (gbifrxr.

—•»—

THE THEORY OF HARMONICA

Sib.—Preparatory to entering upon a consideration 0/ other subjects connected with the Science of Slusic, permit me to offer the following remarks explanatory of the theory of harmonics,—aa important branch of the science, but one, by musicians generally, but imperfectly understood, and has thus led to the most erroneous conclusions.

The harmonics of a sound arc, theoretically, those whose vibratioas in a given period are some integral number of times those of the giien sound; thus, whilst the generating sound gives one vibration,its barmonies ore those which give 2, 3, 4, &c. vibrations in the same time. As the number of vibrations of a musical string is inversely as to length, the above corresponds with, and is equivalent to, a division of the string into 2, 3, 4, or a greater number of equal parts, one of which parts gives the harmonic sound. Let then a musical string giving a certain sound, say C, be divided into any number of equal pern, as denoted by the following figures, then one of these parts will give the corresponding harmonic, the figures also representing the ratio of to vibrations as compared with the generating sound, or unity, the ratios of the other sounds, one with another, being similarly exhibited:—

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 161 ,

■1 C C G C B G * C D B » G > * » B 0 j^Cl

Were the series extended further, it would be seen that every aMffloaic as it enters the series becomes the generator of another series of harmonics, following each other precisely in the same order and ratio as those of the original series, and these again of others, and soonlo.iilUnity, the whole of which are harmonics of the original generating sound ; thns the series commencing with G is from C as aboire;— fd,

•..."* 3 6 9 12 151 , , .,.1,1^,

G G D G B l&c, , i

or from:G 1 2 3 4 5 J

These harmonic sounds are exactly similar in their order and ratios to those of the series commmencing'with C. Comparing the magnitudes of the harmonic intervals, we perceive that they gradually become less, according to the following ratios, f, |, j, }, |, J, and so on j bat as the smallest consonant interval is f, therefore 5 and all following are dissonant intervals. Confining our attention for the present to the consonant ratios 1, 3, 5, considering the octave sounds as identical, we perceive that the generating sound produces firstly its 5th, and secondly its major 3(1, and as these harmonics become the generators of other series similar to the first, the law is general; obeying this law we arc enabled to exhibit the harmonies in a tabular form, thus disposing of the sounds as they enter by 5ths in vertical columns, and as they enter by major Sds in horizontal columns, we have, formed from the consonant ratios, tho following

.. . Synopsis of Harmonic Sounds. , ... ,.

[table]

which exhibits them in every relation and combination. The ratio of the vibrations of any sound as compared with the generator may be found by multiplying together the ratios at the heads of tho t»o columns which intersect each other at the required sound. The table may be extended indefinitely in any or every direction ; it may also be cnrtniled so as to commence with any sound as generator, taking care only that such portion ia contained by four sides parallel with those of the table, the ratio, of course, commencing with that sound.it may also terminate upon any sound. Taking the first sound m the Table, Bb b, we perceive that all the sounds contained in the table are harmonics of that sound, also, that they arc negative harmonics of d x, the last son1"1

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