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actually a tone higher, to 0. Mad. Mainville-Fodor, who, no doubt was well aware that Zerline's pieces would please the Parisians more than anything else in the opera, very wisely chose this part, and the result shows that she calculated correctly. What does it matter to her that the opera is cast most faultily, if she is only greeted with tumultuous appla\tse t This, however, the connoisseur can only allow her to merit by forgetting that she plays the part of a peasant girl, and by entirely renouncing all truth of pourtrayal, for she decks out the simple strains of her part with a number of high-trotting ornaments, which, however magnificently she executes them, are here doubly exceptionable, firstly, because they are altogether out of place in Mozart's music, and secondly, because they do not agree with the character of her part. If we leave these out of consideration, it certainly is an unusual treat to hear this part, which, in Germany, is generally given to the third lady, sung here by the first, and one, moreover, so distinguished. Herr Garcia, as Don Juan, gave us too much of a good thing. Whenever he can, by any means, manage it, he is ready with some ornament an ell long. Such ornamentation is most out of place in the serenade, where the figured mandolin accompaniment forbids even the simplest. In spite of this, however, he runs about in the wildest fashion, and, in order to do so, has the tempo taken very slowly. To make up for this, however, he sings his air, "Treibt der Champagner" incomparably, and I confess I never heard it so well given. The fluent Italian language is, however, of great service to him, and instead of his breath failing him, as it generally does our German singers, his strength goes on increasing to the very end.

The other parts wero, on the whole, well dlst; at any rate, none were badly so; and it must be thankfully allowed that every one exerts himself to the utmost to do honour to the work. We may, too, be very well satisfied with the performance, if we only forget what we have a right to expect from such a distinguished body of artists. Thus much, however, soon becomes evident to a German, namely, that these singers, who give modern Italian music, especially Rossini's, with the greatest perfection, cannot execute Mozart's with the same degree of excellence—it is of too different a sort. The effeminate, sweet style, quite in keeping with the former, weakens too much the energetic character, which is more peculiar to Don Juan than to any other of Mozart's operas.

The orchestra, which the Parisians always call the first in the world, displayed, at any rate, some few weak points this evening. In the first place, the wind instruments were twice most strikingly deficient, and, secondly, the whole body was so unsteady, several times, that the conductor was obliged to have recourse to beating time. I am now still more strengthened in my conviction that a theatrical orchestra, however excellent, shotild not, on account of the great distance between the two ends, be conducted otherwise than by beating time, and that it is not advisable for the conductor himself to play, not even when, as Herr Grasset did, he continually marks the time by the movements of his body and by his violin. The orchestra is, however, justly celebrated for the discretion with which it accompanies the singers, and might, in this respect, serve as a model for all the other Parisian orchestras, as well as for many German ones.

The chorus, also, is admirable, and produced an especially strong and magnificent effect in the concluding allegro of

the first finale. But why was this allegro, here too, as in most other places, taken with such immoderate quickness 1 Do conductors never reflect that they only impair instead of increasing its strength, and that the triplet-figures of the violins, which are intended to give life and movement to the broad masses, can no longer, with such frantically rapid time, be brought out distinctly and vigorously, so that all the public at last heara consists merely of skeleton-like outlines, without anything to fill tbem up, instead of the living whole 1'

When any one hears the effeot of so magnificent a piece of music lessened by a false tempo, he must again feel an earnest wish that, at length, the marking of the tempi should be universally determined in MalzePs or Weber's manner (or, still better, in both). It is true that the conductors would then be obliged to conform conscientiously to this plan, and not, as they do at present, unreservedly follow their own feeling.

MOZART—CHILD AND MAN.
(Continued from page 112, fbi. 88.)
74.

The Same to the Same.

Bologna, July 21»i, 1770. Wb congratulate you on your file day, wishing you good liealtli, and before all the grace of God. It is the one thing necessary, all the others are added blessings. We have been to hear a mass performed at CivitaCastellana, after which Wolfgang played on the organ. On the 16th we went to Loretto, I bought several relies there; amongst others a splinter of the true Cross. We saw the fair at Sinigaglia; yesterday we camo here. We left Rome on the 10th; the Count Pallavicini has offered us here all thnt we wanted. I accepted the offer of his carriage. If Wolfgang cuntiuues to grow as lie does, he will be very tall.

P.S. of Wolfgang.—I congratulate my dear mother on her fite-day, and hope she may live a hundred year*. It is what I pray God for every day, and what I shall continue to ask for her and for my sister in my prayers. I can only offer my mother the bells, the wax candles, the cops and the ribbons, that we bought at Loretto, and which wo will bring her. Meanwhile I remarri her ■faithfnl child.

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e vi fanno morire quanch avrete milie auni. Spero che ovi imparerete meglio conoscermi in avvctiire e che poi ue giudicheretc come ch 'egli vi piace., II tempo non mi permetto di eciiver moltc la penna non vale un corno, no pure quello che la dirigge. 11 titolo dell' opera che ho da componere a Milano non si sa anchora.

I have just received as a pretent from our hostess at Rome, the "Thousand and One Kiglits" in Italian) they are very amusing tales to read.

75. 1 The Same to the Same.

Bologna, July 28M, 1770.

My leg hag not got quite well yet; this accident will cost us 12 ducats. It is not very gay work being ill while at an inn; if I had made 1000 ducats at Naples I could easily console myself for the expense of my illness. However we have always something in hand, and with that, thank God, we live happily.

Yesterday we received the libretto,and the names of those who compote the Opera company. The title of the opera is, Mitridate re di Ponto, and it is written by a poet of Turin, Vittorio Amedeo Ciqua Santi by name. The opera was performed in 1767. The dramatis pcrBOnsa are:—

Mitridate, King of Pontus, Signor Gulielmo d' Ettore, tenor.

Atpatia, betrothed to Mithridate.SignoraAntoniaBernasconi, prima donna.

Tipare, Son of the King, in love with Aspasia, Signor Santorini, first soprano, (who played in the last Carnival at Turin.)

Farnace, eldest Sou of Mithridate, in love with Aspasia, Signor Cicognani.

Ismene, Daughter of the King of Parti, in love with Farnace, i prima donna, the Signora Varese.

Arlate, Governor of Mijea soprano. | ,>t ^.%f
Magio, Roman Tribune, tenor.

We heard Sartonini sine at Rome, Ho already know La' and Cicognani it also our f'

The two portraits have pleased us very much, but one must not look too closely at them, for a pastel is not a miniature. They are rather too highly coloured, but they lose this looking at them from a distance j and we are satisfied and that is enough.

i>.S. of Wolfgang.—Cara Sorella mio, Io vi devo confessare che ho un grandiseimo piacere che vi avete mandat i minuetti i quali mi piaccio in molto.

76.

The Same to the Same.

Bologna, August Uh, 1770.

I shall be surprised if my illness costs me less than 20 ducats, if it is even as little. With the help of God, if one keeps one's health let the devil take the money! Mislinetscheck* who has just paid us a visit, has the first opera for the Carnival of 1772, to do at Milan.

F.S. -of Wolfgang.—-I am truly sorry for poor Martha, who still continues ill, and I pray every day for her return to health; tell her from me not to agitate herself, and to eat a great many salt things. Apropos ! Have you given my letter to Kobini? You have said nothing about it; when you see him tell him he has quite forgotten mo. I cannot write better than this, as my pen is made for making notes, not for letters. I have got fresh strings to my violin, and I play every day.

I only tell you this because my mother wished to know if I still played on the violin. I have had the honour of going alone at least six times to different churches, and assisting in some magnificent ceremonies. Meanwhile I have already composod four Italian symphonies, besides fire or six songs, and a motet.

Does your M. Balordo come often? and dees ho still honour you with his interesting discourses? and Monsieur Charles Noble, of Vogt, does he still condescend to listen to your insupportable voices? Tell Mr. Schidenhofeu to help him often to compose minuets, or else he shall have no more bons-bons. My duty-would be, if I had time, to inflict on MM. de Mcelle and Schidenhofen a letter, but I have not a minute to spare. I pray them then to excuse me, and reserve myself the honour for another time. My sole amusement consists in the somersaults I permit -myself from time to time. Italy is a country for making one sleep, and ono always feels sleepy m it.

* Composer born near Prague, in 1737, and that the Italians called

II Boeno. He died in Borne in 1781, after having struggled against poverty a long time. He only received from his operas 50 to GO sequins, that is about 16 pounds.

(To-be Continued.)

ADVERTISEMENTS.

JTTLLTKN FUND.—A- severe illness, ending in mental aberration, has rendered it necessary to place M. Jul Hen in a lunatic asylum, M the only chance of his ultimate recovery. For somo years—through causes not unknown to the public—M Jnllien's affairs have boen in a hopeless stato. and *ery recently he was compelled to appear beforo tho Bankruptcy Court in Paris. HaTing obtained his certificate, M. Jullicn was about to Institute, with tho c^vnteuance and support of several influential persons, a series of musical perfanoAueee on the Continent previous to hi* return to this country. The first touccrt was to take place on the 10th nst., all the preparations having been made, but the excitement attendant on hia aHoua duties in superintending them, corneal, d with a keen sense of his recent misfortunes, brought on a state of anxiety ■which led to M. Jullien's present unhappy coudition. Under theso circumstances M JuUira and those dependent ou him are left destitute. With a view of raining such a somas may provide for his maintenance in the asylum, and secure a modest provision for bis family, an APPEAL is made to the generosity of the British pubuc, to whose amusements M. Julllen has diligently and faithfully administered for upwards of twenty years. Honorary Treasurers—Messrs. John Mitchell, 33. Otd Bond-street: Thorna* Chappoll, 60, New Bond-street; W. B. Sams 1. Sc. Jimes's-street. Bankers—Messrs. Cout'S, Strand; Hey woo i, Kcnnards, and Co.. Lombard-street; London and County Bank, Hanover-aquare; who us well as tho Honorary Treasurers, liavc kindly consented to recotvo sub.criptious.

First Subscription List
£20 0 0 Albert Smith, Esq.

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HER MAJESTY'S THEATRE, HAYMARKET.— The Lessee: and Director, having completed arrangements which enable him to make the announcement under peculiarly favourable circumstances, has tho gratification to acquaint the nobility, gentry, and public, that Her Majesty's Theatre will Open for the Season on tho 10th of April next. Her Majesty's Tucatre has been for more than a century recognized as the first Lyric Theatre in Europe. With this magnificent establishment are intimately associated all tho splendours and glories of Italian Opera. The history of Her Majesty's Theatre is identified with the progress of musio lathis country, and its name is made memorable by tho special patronage of Royalty. Its spacious and noble area. Its peculiarity of construction—which renders it the finest theatre in tho world for sound—its perfect adaptation for the purposes of music, and, more than all, its locality in the most fashionable and easily-accessible part of the metropolis, point to it as tho temple of high-art entertainment best adapted to the taste and accommodation of the Court and the aristocracy. In short, no other Opera-house in existence can boast of equal advantages, in convenience of site, fitness and commodiousuess of construction, and elegance of appearance. During his previous seasons at Drury Lane Theatre, the Director received from tho nobility and subscriber a gratifying recognition of his endeavours to place before them, uader the most advise circumstances, the best works, supported by the best avail" • able talent. Nor did the fidelity with which he adhered to tho programmes, and, still more, the liberality shown in exceeding the promises contained therein, pass unnoticed. Tho experience of lost year, however, has led him to appreciate the serious objections to the establishment of an Italian Opera in any situation separated from the West-end, and not acces sible by eftay approaches. To ensure success to his new management, a removal from Drury-lane to the Haymarket was imperatively necessitated. The untoward circumstances which have precluded the opening of Her Majesty's Theatre need not be alluded to in this place. It is enough to say that steps have boon taken to place the Italian Opera on a permanent footing in its appropriate homo, and with such complete arrangements in overy

department, as to lead to a confident hope that "Her Majesty's" will be restored to its ancient splendonr and prestige. The lessee is deeply impressed with the responsibilities of his new undertaking. He feels that he has made himself

onswor.ible to all bis patrons for the procmction of every work at Her Majesty's Theatre in a style of completeness and excellence worthy of their tnpport. As an assurance tlist due exertion ill not be wanting to arrive at this result, he refers only to the list of artists in tho programme for the coming season, which will be immediately published. Thu Director has the greatest strtisfaetion of announcing that he h-is been able to retain the invaluable services of Mademoiselle Titiens, now universally acknowledged to be tho greatest living dramatic vocalis-t, and to secure thoso ol Madame Alboni, tho unrivalled queen of. song; also Madamo Borghi Mamo, of the Grand-Opera and the Theatre Imperial Italian, Paris, who will make her first appearance in this country. In making engagements for tho orchestra, the greatest care has been taken to secure thorough efficiency in every department. The direction has been confided to fiignor Arditi and M. Benedict. To Her Majesty's Theatre belong the most brilliant reminUconcos of the ballet, which department wilt be complete in every ieapect»com prising artists of reputation. Among the engagements already concluded, maybe mentioned Madlle. Pocchini, Madlle. Ferraris, and Mndlle. Cucchi (of the Imperial Opera* Vienna), who will raako her first ap[MAm»rw Cm.friflerabl? alterations and improvements will be made in He> Majesty's Theatre, to conduce to the comfort and satisfaction of the subscribers and the public. Tne crush room and entrances will be reudered commo iious and elegant, a perfect system of ventilation will be adopted, and every caro be taken to insure lha accommodation of the audience. With a rdpertoiro so ox tensive and attractive as that of Her Majesty's Theatre, an assemblage of talent so romarkable, and with so magnificent a theatre, in every way peculiarly adapted to the various performances, the Director confidently looks to tho nobility and tho public for support. To fulfil tho conditions entailed in carrying on so vast an establishment, requires more than common energies and common resources; and it is only by liberal assistance from tho patrons of art, among the aristocracy and the public, that any good result ©an follow. While no labour, effort, or expeuso will bo spared to render the performance of tho highest excellence, tho Lessee expects to receive that powerful aid, without which art, in its delicate and expressive form, cannot prosper. The conservation of Italian Opera in its proper temple rests more particularly with the exclusive classes; and the Director trusts that ho shall obtain, as he -hall earnestly endeavour to merit, their liberal patronage and assistance. Such assistance h.is been afforded to him on another occasion. May he not, without presumption, anticipate its extension to him in the present loftier and more onerous enterprise? The Director has ventured to speak thus openly, thinking it just and necessary to assert his full cow prehension of the various and arduous duties and responsibilities which must dgvulve on the Manager of Her Majesty's Theatre. Ttie Box-office of tho Theatre is open daily for subscribers under tho management of Mr. Nugent.

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SADLER'S WELLS THEATRE.
MONDAY, March 19th.
GRAND VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT for the BENEFIT of a
LITERARY GENTLEMAN, long suffering from severe illness.

PROGRAMME.

PABT I. ...

Duet, "Tell me. Gentle Stranger" Parry.

Mr. and Miss Ransford.

Song, "Dear, Delightful Dancing'' Montgomery.

Mies Louise Keeley.
Composed expieasly for her.

Song, "The Red-Cross Banner" Nelson.

Mr. George Tedder.

Song, "Gentle Troubadour" Wallace.

Miss Emily Jonns.

Romantic Ballad, "ThoTwo Castles" S. Lover.

Mme. Catherine Hayes.
Written and composed lor her.

Solo, Violiu, "Raltarella"

Herr Moliquo, accompanied by Mr. Lindsay £ .

Dnet, "Tho Swiss Maidens" Holme*.

The Misses Brougham.

Song, "Margaretta" Balfe.

Mr. Sims Reeves.

Glee, "Maying" Muller.

Quartet Glee Union.
Song, "Whero Trembling Lotus Flowers Lie" .. .. H. Loder.
Miss Louise Keeley.

Song, "Tom Tough" Dibdin.

Mr. Ransford.

Song, "The Last R030 of Summer" Moore.

Madame Catherino Hayes.

Cavatina, "Away to the Fairies' Well" E. Land.

Miss Ransford.

Grand Duet for Two Pianofortes, "Les Huguenots".. .. G.Osborne. Messrs. Benedict and Lindsay Sloper. Mr. ALBERT SMITH has kindly consented to appear in the course of the evening.

PART II

Gleo, "The Soldier's Love" Kucken.

Quartet Glee Union.

Song, "The Young Volunteer"

Miss Stabbach.
Composed expressly for her.

Song, "Under the Greenwood Tree"

Mr. Sims Reeves.

Solo, Violoncello, Fautasia.. Piatti.

Signor Piatti.

Ballad, "Home, Sweet Home" H. Bishop.

Miss Laura Baxter,
Song, "Ab, si, ben mio" Verdi.

Mr. George Perren.

New Ballad, "Clarine" L. 1

Miss Lnsoolles.
Song, "The Thorn"

Mr. George Tedder.

Song, "Shadow Song" «

Mdlte. Parepa.

Duet, "Si la stanchezza" Verdi.

Mr. George Perren and Miss Laura Baxter.

Song, "La Vivandicra Vlanesi.

Miss Stabbach. Composed expressly for her. Mr. and Mrs. GERMAN REED will generously lend their assistance in a short selection from their POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT.

Conductors—Me-srs. BENEDICT, LINDSAY SLOPER, and W1LHELM GANZ.

The concert to commence at 8 o'clock. Places to be obtained from Mr. Austin at the Box Office, open dally, at the following prices :—Dross Circle, 4s. : Stalls on the Stage, numbered and reserved, 4s.; Upper Boxes, 3s.; Pit, 2s.; Gallery, Is. Private Boxes, £2 2s. and 12s. Oil.

FERRARI'S WORK ON THE VOICE AND SINGING, price 8s., may be hod at his residence, Devonshire-lodge^ For eland-road, Portland-place, and at all tho principal music-sellers.

"01* all tho treatises on the cultivation of the voice that have appeared for maay years, it is the most sensible, concise, and useful."—Daily Newt.

"There is more sense in this work than wo find in nine out of ton publications of a similar kind."—Atfunceum.

"Here is a really sensible work."—Muskal World.

DONALD DUNCAN'S

PURE SCOTCH MALT WHISKIES,

ARE CHEAPER, MORE WnOLESOME, AND FAR SUPERIOR TO THE FINEST FRENCH BRANDY. ROYAL BALMORAL, a very fine, mild, and mellow spirit .. 18s. per Gallon. THE PRINCE'S USQUEBEAUGH, a much admired and) 18s

delicious spirit t

DONALD DUNCAN'S Celebrated Registered DD. Whiskey 1 D

of extraordinary quality and age i"

Two gallons of either of the above sent to any part, or sample forwarded for 12 postage stamps. Terms cash. 4, Burleigh-street, Strand, W.C.

Published by JonN Boosey, of Castlebar-hill, in the parish of Ealing, in the County of Middlcsox, at tho office of Boosey & Sons, 28, Holies-street.

Printed by William Spencer Johnson, "Nassau Steam Press," 60, St. Martin's lane, in the Parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields, in the County of Middlesex.— Saturday, March IT, 1800.

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"the 'wosth Of Art Affkasb Host Eminent In Music, Since It EeqVibes No Material, No Subject-matter, Whose Effect Most Be Deducted. It Is Whollt Pobm And Tower, And It Raises And Ennobles Whatever It Expresses."Got He.

STTB8CEIPTI0H:—Stamped for Postage, 20s. per annum—Payable in advance, by Cash or Post Office Order, to B00SEY & SONS, 28, Holies Street, Cavendish Square. .' ~..

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DSDElt THK HOST r>lSTINGUISHEI> PATKONAOK OF

HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE QUEEN,
H.R.H. THE PRINCE CONSORT,
'AL HIGHNESSES THE PRINCESSES AND PRINCES OF THE

ROYAL FAMILY,
The Most Worshipful the Grand Master ol Irehud,
His Grace theDUKE of LEINSTER,
.tnor'U And Several other Distinguislitd Freemason*;

His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the
EARL of EGL1NTON and WINTON.
The LORD BISHOP OP MANCHESTER,
The Right Worshipful the MAYOR OF MANCHESTER,
IVIE MACK1E. Esq.
His Worship the M .yor of Salford, W. HARVEY, Esq.
8IR FREDERICK GORE OUSELEY, Bart., Director of Music at the
University of Oxford.
And many of the Mobility, Gentry, Clergy, and distinguished Families of the Empire-

DR. MARK'S
GREAT NATIONAL ENTERPRISE

Organised in 1R48, and developed at THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC
BRIDGE STREET. MANCHESTER, established by him oxpns«ly an n Grcnt
National Institution to facilitate the Encouragement and Promotion of NATIVE
MUSICAL TALENT, and the GENERAL ADVANCEMENT OF MUSIC
AMONG THE RISING GENERATION, upon his now and effective syBtem,
also as a Normal School for the training of masters to conduct Covservatoirks
Ot Mvkic to be established throughout the United Kingdom, for Uttli
Children, the whole comprising an entirely new scheme of NATIONAL
EDUCATION, by blending music with general instruction, so that the study
of mu-ic .hall become a branch of education in the humblest of schools of this
country. To illustrate and to rouse an interest in ovcry town and city for these
institutions. Dr. Mark travels with a number of his pupils occasionally through
theoountry—giving lectures, and introducing his highly approved and pleasing
Musical Entertainmont. entitled DR MARK AND HIS LITTLE MEN, who
number upwards of Thirty Instrumentalists, and a most Efficient Chorus, the
whole forming a most unique and complete Juvenile Orchestra, composed of
LITTLE ENGLISH. IRISH. SCOTCH AND WELCH BOYS, FROM FIVE TO
SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE, who play Operatic Selections, Solos, Marches,
Quadrille*. Galops, be, and sing Mong* «nd Choruses in a most effective manner,
and to whom Dr. Mark gives a gratuitous General ;vnd Musical Education.
APPOINTMENTS OF MASTERS AND ARRANGEMENTS OF CLASSES IN
THE ABOVE INSTITUTION.
Principal of tho Royal College of Music ; Director. Composer, and}

Conductor; Lecturer to both Private and Public, Theoretical >Dr. Mark.

and Practical Instrumental and Vocal Classes J

Master of the General Educational Department :\ M_ P„_,„

Writing. Reading, Arithmetic, Grammar, Dictition, ( „ml Two

amatory' Geography, Practical Geometry, and Book-1 AMiitaut Teachers.

"PRACTICAL ASSISTANT TEACHER6. Organ

Pian.,

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Viol

IN) :-j3 i<j Jnyenlil ui r-j:.'j ..

H —llo, Double Bass, and Viol*

Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, and Clarionet
Comet and other Brass Instruments
Concertina (German and English)

Voeal QlM f. rPrTA*M "ti'il'l)
Dr. M4RJC has also made provision for the Orphans of*ihc Musical Profession
possessing musical talent, who will find the above Institution a happy home, and
receive a most effective general and musical education, board, and clothing, tree
of all expense.

Little Boys, from fivo to nine years of age, apprenticed for throe, five, or seven
Tears by paying a modorate entrance fee to cover tho cxpouses of instrument and

Twelve appointments ready for Masters.
For Prospectuses, apply direct to the Royal College of Music, Bridgc-stroct,
Manchester.

Dr. Mark Is also open to Engagements with his Little Mon.
Dr. MARK begs to invite the Parents and Friends, and all those interested in
he Education of the Youths of this country to visit his
"5 to Eleven, a.m., and Two and

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ST. JAMES'S HALL,

REGENT-STREET AND PICCADILLY. vqtoc."

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ST. JAMES'S HALL.—On Wednesday evening next, March 28th, the Voeal Association (President, the Right Hon. the Earl of Dudley). Conductors— Mr. Benedict and Mr. C. E. Horsley. Artist*—Madnmo Sainton-Dolby, Miss Fanny Row laud: pianoforte, Mif>« Ehanor Watd; violin, M Sainton. M idrigals nud part songs by t. •■ cb"ir, under the direction of M. Benedict, Ticket*. Is., 8s., and 5s. each/ at the Hall. Cjm"menc« ut 8, terminate 10*15.

CT. MARTIN'S HALL.—Mis JULIA WOOLFS new

O Concertante Duett for piano and violin will be performed for the first time by her and Herr Greebe, at the above Hail, on Monday evening next.

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SADLER'S WELLS THEATRE.
MONDAY, March 19th.
GRAND VOCAL and INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT for the BENEFIT of a
LITERARY GENTLEMAN, long suffering from severe illness.

PROGRAMME.

PABT I. ...

Duet, " Tell me. Gentle Stranger" Parry.

Mr. and Miss Ransford.

Song, "Dear, Delightful Dancing" Montgomery.

Mi.-s Louiso Keeley.
Composed expi essly for her.

Song, "The Red-Cross Banner" Nelson.

Mr. George Tedder.

Song, "Gentle Troubadour" Wallace.

Miss Emily Jenns.

Romantic Ballad, "TheTwo Castles" S. Lover.

Mme. Catherine Hayes.
Written and composed for her.

Solo, Violiu, "SallareU»" .. Mf jm

Herr Molique, accompanied by Mr. Lindsay Slopor.

Duet, "Tho Swiss Maidens" Hole

The Misses Brougham.

Song, "Margaretta" Balfe.

Mr. Sims Reeves.

Glee, "Maying" Muller.

Quartet Glee Union.
Song, "Where Trembling Lotus Flowers Lie" .. .. B. Loier.
Miss Louise Keeley.

Song, "Tom Tough" Dlbdin.

Mr. Ransford.

Song, "The Last Rose of Summer" Moore.

Madame Catherine Hayes.

Cavatina, "Away to the Fairies' Well" E. Land.

Miss Ransford.

Grand Duet for Two Pianofortes, "Les Huguenots".. .. G.Osborne. Messrs. Benedict and Lindsay Sloper. Mr. ALBERT SMITH has kindly consented to appear in the course of the evening.

PART It.

Gleo, "The Soldier's Love" Kucken.

Quartet Glee Union.

Song, "The Young Volunteer" .. .'. Vianosi.

MUs Stabbach.
Composed expressly for her.

Song, "Under the Greenwood Tree' Hatton.

Mr. Sims Reeves.

Solo, Violoncello, Fautasla.. Piatti.

Slgnor Piatti.

Ballad, "Home, Sweet Home" H. Bishop.

Miss Laura Baxter,
Song, "Ah, si, ben mio" Verdi.

Mr. George Perren.

New Ballad, "Clarino" L. Williams.

Miss Loscelles.

Song, "Tho Thorn" Shield.

Mr. Ooorge Tedder.

Song, * Shadow Song" Meyerbeer.

Mdlle. Parepa.

Duet, "Si la stanchczza" Verdi.

Mr. George Perren and Miss Laura Baxter.

Song, "La Vivandicra .. Vianeai.

Miss Stabbach. Composed expressly for her. Mr. and Mrs. GERMAN REED will generously lend their assistance in a Bhort selection from their POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT.

Conductors—Me.-srs. BENEDICT, LINDSAY SLOPER, and WILHELM GANZ.

The concert to commenco at 8 o'clock. Places to be obtained from Mr. Austin at the Box Office, open daily, at the following prices:—Dress Circle, 4s. ; Stalls on the Stage numbered and reserved, 4s.; Upper Boxes, 3s.; Pit, 2s.; Gallery, Is. Private Boxes, £2 2s. and 12s. Od.

■PERRARrS WORK ON THE VOICE AND SINGING,

X price 8s., may be had at his residence, Devonshire-lodge, Portland-road, Portlaud-place, and at all tho principal music-sellers.

"01* all the treatises on the cultivation of the voice that have appeared for muy years, it is the most sensible, concise, and useful."—Daily New*.

"There is more sense in this work than we find in nine out of tou publications of a similar kind."—Athtnaum.

"Here is a really sensible work."—Musical World.

DONALD DUNCAN'S

PURE SCOTCH MALT WHISKIES,

ARE CHEAPER, MORE WnOLESOME, AND FAR SUPERIOR TO THE FINEST FRENCH BRANDY. ROYAL BALMORAL, a vcrv fine, mild, and mellow spirit .. 16s. per Gallon. THE PRINCE S USQUEBEAUGH, a much admired and 1 1&| Do

delicious spirit i*"

DONALD DUNCAN'S Celebrated Registered DD. Whiskey ) Mf> Do

of extraordinary quality and age j"'

Two gallons of either of the above aent to any part, or sample forwarded for 12 postage stamps. Terms cash. 4, Burleign-street, Strand, W.C.

[graphic]

Published by John Booset, of Castlobar-hill, in tho parish of Ealing, in the County of Middlesex, at tho office of Boosky & Sons, 28, Holies-street.

Printed by William Spkncer Johs'son, "Nassau Steam Press," 60, St. Mart>u's laae, in the Parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields, in the County of Middlesex.— Saturday, March IT, 1860.

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