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WORKS EDITED BY J. W. DAVISON.

1

la oiie volume, price 4s., or bound in clotb, 6s. 6<1.,
large size,

DUSSEK'S PLUS ULTRA SONATA,

WOELFFL'S NE PLUS ULTRA SONATA,

With Biographical and Critical Introductions, by
J. W. DAVISON.

(Ia a few days.)

%

In stiff sides, price 8s„ or bound in cloth, 10s. Gd., large size,

CHOPIN'S MAZURKAS,

(complete)
Edited by J. W. DAVISON,
With Critical Preface, and Portrait of Chopin.

3.

In stiff sides, price 6s., or bound in clotb, 8s. 6d., large size,
(In a fow days),

MENDELSSOHN'S
SONGS WITHOUT WORDS,

Edited by J. W. DAVISON,

With Descriptive and Critical Preface and Portrait of Mendelssohn.

*#* Auother Edition of this Work is published, in large Ito, cloth, gilt, price 7s. 6d.

4.

In two volumes, 10s, 6d. each, or bound in cloth, price 13s. each, large size,

BEETHOVEN'S
PIANOFORTE SONATAS,

(cOltr-LETE)

Edited by J. W. DAVISON,
With Descriptive and Critical Introductions, and Portrait of
Beethoven.

*#* Another Edition of this Work is also published, in two volumes, large 4to, cloth, gilt, price 10s. 6d. each; uniform with Mendelssohn's « Songs Without Words.

tLondon/: Boosey and Sons, Holies-street,

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

ROSSINI'S STABAT MATER,

New and Complete Edition for the Pianoforte, "5
Br

HENRY SMART,
| Price 3a,, or handsomelyj bound, 5s.

THE CROWN DIAMONDS,

New and Complete Edition, for Pianoforte, with Illustrations by BRANDARD, And Introduction, describing the Plot and Music. Price 6s., in cloth, Forming the Twentieth volume of Boosey and Sons' Series of Pianoforte Operas.

EVANS' ENGLISH HARMONIUMS.

BOOSEY AND SONS

Beg to announce, that owing to the demand for these instruments having for some time past considerably exceeded their means of supply, they have now made arrangements to

GREATLY EXTEND ITHEIR MANUFACTORY,

BY THB ADDITION OF

L.ARCE PREMISES,

; is

DAVIS-STREET, OXFORD-STREET,

Which, with their extensive establishments in

WELLS-STREET And RED LION-YARD,

Will enable them to execute orders, to an unlimited extent, with the greatest promptitude.

Holies-street,

March 3, 18G0.

Published by Jons Boosey, of Castlobar-bill, in the pariah of Ealing, in tho County of Middlesex, at the offieo of Boosey & Sons, 28, Holles-streot.

Printed by William Spenceb Johnson, "Nassau Steam Press," 60, St. Martin's laae, in the Parish of St. liartln-in-the-Fields, in the County of Middlewx. Saturday, March 8,1890.

"THE WORTH OF ART APPEARS XOST EMINENT IN MUSIC, SINCE IT REQUIRES NO MATERIAL, NO SUBJEOT-MATTER, WHOSZ EFFEOT UUST

BE DEDUCTED. IT IS WHOLLY FORM AND POWER, AND IT RAISES AND ENNOBLES WHATEVER IT EXPRESSES."-Göthe.

SUBSCRIPTION:-Stamped for Postage, 20s. per annum-Payable in advanoe, by Cash or Post Office Order,

to BOOSEY & SONS, 28, Holles Street, Cavendish Square.

VOL. 36.–No. 10.

VOL. 38.-No. 10.

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ST. JAMES'S HALL,

K.

REGENT STREET AND PICCADILLY.

MONDAY POPULAR CONCERTS.

UNDER THE MOST DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OF
HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE QUEEN

H.R.H. THE PRINCE CONSORT,
THEIR ROYAL HIGHNESSES THE PRINCESSES AND PRINCES OF THE
ROYAL FAMILY,

THE FIFTEENTH CONCERT OF THE SEASON,
The Most Worshipful the Grand Master of Ireland,
His Grace the DUKE of LEINSTER,

MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 12th, 1860,
And Several other Distinguished Freemasons;
His Excellency the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the
EARL of EGLINTON and WINTON,

AN ITALIAN NICHT.
The LORD BISHOP OF MANCHESTER,
The Right Worshipful the MAYOR OF MANCHESTEP.,

PROGRAMME
IVIE MACKIE. ESQ.
His Worship the Miyor of Salford, W. HARVEY, Esq.

PART 1.
SIR FREDERICK GORE OUSELEY, Bart., Director of Music at the

QUINTET, in A major (Op. 20, No. 5) .. .. .. Boccherini. University of Oxford.

(First time.)
And many of the Nobility, Gentry, Clergy, and distinguished Families of the Empire. Herr Becker, Herr Ries, Mr. Doyle, X. Paque, and Signor Piatti.

RECITATIVE e RONDO," Ah non sai qual pena" . Sarti,
DR. MARK'S

Madile. Euphrosyne Parepa.
GREAT NATIONAL ENTERPRISE

SONATA, in A major (Op. 25), Pianoforte .. .. .. Clementi,

(First time.) Organised in 1848, and developed at THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC

Mr. Charles Halle. BRIDGE STREET, MANCHESTER. established by him expressly as a Great ARIA, “Pieta Signore."

..

Först time) National Institution to facilitate the Encouragement and Promotion of NATIVE

.. Stradella. MUSICAL TALENT, and the GENERAL ADVANCEMENT OF MUSIC

Mr. Sims Reeves. AMONG THE RISING GENERATION, upon his new and effective system, CAPRICCIO, “ Trillo del Diavolo." Violin .. .. Tartini. also as a NORMAL SCHOOL for the training of masters to conduct CONSERVATOIRES

(First time.) of Music to be established throughout the United Kingdom, for LITTLE

Herr Becker.
CHILDREN, the whole comprising an entirely new scheme of NATIONAL
EDUCATION, by blending music with general instruction, so that the study

PART II.
of music shall become a branch of education in the humblest of schools of this GRAND QUARTET, in E flat major (No. 1.), for two
country. To illustrate and to rouse an interest in every town and city for these

Violins, Vinde, and Violoncello (By dosire) ".. Cherubini. institutions, Dr. Mark travels with a number of his pupils occasionally through

Herr Becker, Herr Ries, Mr. Doyle, and Signor Piatti. the country-giving lectures, and introducing bis highly approved and pleasing

ARIA, “Pria che spunti in ciel l'aurora." Musical Entertainment, entitled DR MARK AND HIS LITTLE MEN. who

(Il Matrimonio Segreto.

. Cimarosa, number upwards of Thirty Instrumentalists, and a most Efficient Chorus, the

(First time.) whole forming & most unique and complete Juvenile Orchestra, composed of

Mr. Sims Reeves. LITTLE ENGLISH, IRISH, SCOTCH AND WELCH BOYS, FROM FIVE TO

HARPSICHORD LESSONS . .::

.. Scarlatti. SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE, who play Operatic Selections, Solos, Marches,

(First time) Quadrilles, Galops, &c., and sing Songs mad Choruses in a most effective manner.

Mr. Charles Halle. and to whom Dr. Mark gives a gratuitous General and Musical Education.

GRAND ARIA, "Se il ciel mi divide" (Didone AbbanAPPOINTMENTS OF MASTERS AND ARRANGEMENTS OF CLASSES IN

dovata.)

Piccini.
THE ABOVE INSTITUTION.

"Madlie. Euphrosyne Parepa. Principal of the Royal College of Music; Director, Composer, and

(By desiru.) . Conductor: Lecturer to both Private and Public, Theoretical Dr. MARK. QUARTET, in D. major (No. 4) .

Donizetti. band Practical Instrumental and Vocal Classes ..

Herr Becker, Horr Ries, Mr. Doyle, and signor Piatti. * Master of the General Educational Department:

(First time.) :) Mr. Powell Writing, Reading, Arithmetic, Grammar, Dictation,

and Two History, Geography, Practical Geometry, and Buok. Assistant Teachers. kooping

CONDUCTOR—MR. BENEDICT. 8 "PRACTICAL ASSISTANT TEACHERS.. Organ .. .. .. .. .. ..

.. .. Mr. BAKER.

( Herr SIEMENS. Pianoforte...

Sofa Stalls, 5s.; Balcony, 38. ; Vareserved Seats, 18.-Tiokets to be had of Mr. ..

Mr. ELDER.

Austin, at the Hall. 28, Piccadilly; MonSrs. Cramer and Co., Hammor Addis n., Mons ROGUIER.

and Co., Schott and Co., Ewor and Co., Simpso, Carter, and Oetzmai and Co., Violin .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. Mon

Mr. BEA6D.

Regen -street; Brooks, 24, Old Cavendisb-street; Bradberry's Lone Crystal Mons. VIEUXTEMPS.

Palace, Oxford-street, Duff and Co., 65, Oxford-stre t; Prowse, Haos y-street; Vloloncello, Double Bass, and Viola

" Mr. T. DONOVAN,

Wylde, Great Hall, Hungerford Market : Chidley, 195, High Holborn: Purday. Mute, Piccolo, Oboe, and Clarionet

Sig. CORTESI.

50, St. Paul's Church-yard; Keith, Prowse, and Co.. 48 Cheapside; Turth, Cornet and other Brass Instruments

Mr. H. RUSSELL.

19, Cor hill : Cook and Co., 6. Finsbury-place. outh: Humfress, 4, Old O rchConcertina (German and English)

Mr. ELDER.

Atreet, Paddington green ; Mitchell, Leader and Co, Olivier, Campbell, and Willis, Messrs. POWELL and

Bond-street; and Chapp. Il and Co., 60, New Bond-street.
Vocal Classes .. .. .. .. . "

ELDER,
Dr. MARK has also made provision for the Orphans of he Musical Profession

M R. CHAS. HALLE will perform Clementi's Sonata in possessing musical talent, who will find the above institution a happy home, and receive a most effective general and musical education, board, and clothing, free

11 A major, Op. 25, and a Selection from Scarlatti's celebrated Harpsichord of all expense.

Lessons for Piano Solo, at the Monday Popular Concerts, St. James's Hall, on, Little Boys, from five to nine years of age, apprenticed for three, five, or seven Monday evening next, March 12. Sofa stalls, 6s.; balcony, 3s.; unreserved years by paying a myderate entrance fee to cover the expenses of instrument and seats, ls. books.

Twelvo appointments ready for Masters.
For Prospectuses, apply direct to the Royal College of Music, Bridge-street,

TTALIAN NIGHT.-MR. SIMS REEVES at the Manchester

1 Munday Popular Concerts._Owing to the great success of the programme Dr. MARK is also open to Engagements with his Little Men.

selected from the works of Italian composers, performed on Monday evening, Dr. MARK begs to invite the Parents and Friends, and all those interested in | Feb. 27. the Directors of the Monday Popular Concerts have much pleasure in his Enterprise and in the Education of the Youths of this country to visit his announcing that they have made arrangements to repeat it on Monday evening establishment. Visiting hours: From Nino to Eleven, a.m.. and Two and next, March 12th, Principal performers:-Mr. Chas. Halle, Herr Becker, Signor Four, p.m. Saturdays and Sundays excepted.

| Piatti, Madlle. Parepa, and Mr. Sims Reeves, Conductor-Mr. Benedict.

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"rpHE ARION" (Eight-Part-Choir).—The members of

X this Society will meet until further no'iee every Thursday ovenin'j-, nt 8 o'clock, at 13, Bcniors-strect, Oxford-street. Conductor, Mr. ALFRED GILBERT.

P. F. REILLY, Hon. Sec.

Persons doslr-us of joining the choir are requested to address the Secretary.

CAUTION to Musicsellers, Booksellers, and others whom it may concern.—•' AM I NOT FONDLY THINE OWNT adopted to a German air, entituied " Du du lieg-t niir im herzen ;" the English version by Maria Hutchins Callcott, and music adapted by Willi tm Hutchins Callcott.

Notice Is Hereby Given that the copyright in the above-mentioned song is Tested in C. Lou&dale, of No. 26, Old Bond-street, music-publisher, and legal proceedings wftl be taken against any pereou who may found to have pirated, or shall hereafter be found pirating, such copyright in the before-named song. Dated this 1st day of March, 1860.

(Signed) CHRISTOPHER LONSDALE.

pAUTION TO MUSIC PUBLISHERS.—" Thou art

V-/ so near, and yet so far," Song, composed by Alexander Beichardt.— Notice is hereby gircu, that the above-named song Is copyright of Mossr*. Duncan Davison and Co., and that legal proceedings will bo taken against all

Eersous infringing tho same. The only publishers whose names and ad dree ave been printed on the titlc-isiue of the said song, by Messrs. Duncan Davi and Co.. ore Messrs. Boosey and Son. Cramer and Co., and Chappell and Co. London: 244, Regent-street, March 1, 1860.

WANTED, A GOOD TUNER—For particulars, address* M. N'., care of Messrs. Boosey and Son.

WANTED, immediately, a Pupil in a Musical Establish

ment, wh -re ho will have an opportunity of acquiring a tb rough

knowledge of the profession in all its branches. Apply to Herr Winzer, Now castle, Staffordshire.

TMPORTANT.— To be disposed of, immediately, a well

A established Music Practice, including New Organ at good salary, in a Town of upwards of 40.000 inhabitants, and surrounded by largo populations. The Advertiser is at>oii: to leave the kingdom. Apply, by letter onlv, to the care ol ViMM. Add sou and Co., 210, Regcut-street, London, W.

^0 INVESTORS.—CONSOLS CAPITAL STOCK is

. n medium for employing and improving huge or Small Sams of Money, in connection with Government Securities. Toe Stock i» Issued by tho Conjol« Insurance Association, 429, Strand, London. Incorporated pursuant to Act of Parliament. Investments bear Fivo per Cent, per Annum Interest, receivable Monthly, if desired. Full particulars may be obtained on application at the Chief Offices, 429, Strand, tu

THOMAS H. BATLIS, Managing Director.

O ORGANISTS AND CHOIR MASTERS.—

WANTED, an Organist and Choir Muter, for the Parish Cliurcb of tho Holy Trinity, in the Cit\ of Coventry. Salary, rfoO per annum. He must be in communion with the Church; must produce satisfactory testimoni la

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character and ability; and will have to 12 men and 16 boys, towards which jf'. Applications to be sent to William Coventry, on or before W< dnesday, the Goveutrv, 8,h March, I860.

provide a choir consist In • of not less than i will be allowed by t he Vestry. Accountant Churchwarden,

rpo VOLUNTEER RIFLE CORPS.—Boosey and Sous

A military band instruments, reed and brass, as well as bugles, drums and fifes, have been used and approved of by almost every regiment in the service, at home and abroad. Those regiments that contemplate the formation of a band, are invited to apply to the firm, who wib be happy to recommend them compcU-nt bandmasteis, and render any further assistance that may be required.—Boosey and Sons, Holies-street, London.

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EYERBEER'S DINORAH AND STERNDALE

BENKETT'S MAY QUEEN, are suug nightly at the CANTERBURY HALL CONCERTS. Comic vocalists—Messrs. George H"ds n (the Irish comedian and mimic). W. J. Critchfleid iin.l E. W. Mackney. Several interesting pictures aro added to the Pino Arts Gallery. The suite of H:ills have been rc-d. corated and beautified, and constitute ouo of tho most unique and brilliant sights of the metropolis.

MUSICAL UNION.—Members who have not received the RECORD. 1860. containing a Portrait of Spohr. and a Sketch of Miiaic In Paris, Ac, to notify the same to the Director. Subscriptions are now due, and

before '""

ticket* will be issued "before Easter. Extra copies of " Record," 1859. to be 3 each, on applying by letter to J. ELLA, Director.

TWO EVENING SERVICES IN A MAJOR: Cantate and Dens, Mtgtincate, and Nunc Dimittis, with Onrsn Accompaniment. Cond by £. Bunnett, Mus. Rac, Cantab. Assistant Organist ol Norwich Cathedral. Price (to Subscribers) 8s. Subscriber's names will be received by the Author, Upper Clone, Norwich, and by the Publishers, Messrs. Cocks bud Co., New Burlington-street, London, W.

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THERE'S NOTHING LIKE A FRESHENING BREEZE," nc-v song by Alberto Randcgger, composed for and sung with the greatest success by Mr. Thomas, when on his last tour, and always encored. Boo*cy and Sons, 28, Holies-street.

EVANS'S ENGLISH HARMONIUMS.—Full particularsof these unrivalled instruments to be had of the manufacturers, Boosey and Sons, 24 and 2$, Holies-street, London. Manufactories at Wells-street and Davies-street.

pASE'S PATENT CONCERTINAS, as used by

\J Sknor Regnudi aud Mr. George Case, arc rcmarkablo for their superior tone, and being less liable to get out of tuue than any other English Concertinas. Prices from four to twelve guineas each. Manulacturid by Boosey and Soum,

HoHes-strcot.

ALBERT DAWES* "AULD LANG SYNE," witk

x\- Variations for the pianoforte, is just published, price 5s., by Dime Davison and Co., 244, Regent-street, where the popular "South Down" Poika, pianoforte, may be obtained, price Is.

REVIEWS.

"The Quadroon Girl"—words by Longfellow, music by Balfe. "Magenta," music by Balfe (Boosey and Sons). Mr. Balfe has bestowed unusual pains upon the fortunes or misfortunes of the poor Quadroon Girl, set forth with such eloquent impressiveness, accompanied by so revolting an insinuation, in the poetry of Professor Longfellow, who, in the last stanzas, plainly intimates that the planter sells his own daughter to become the slave and minion of the slavedealer ;—

"'The soil ia barren, the farm ia old,'
The thoughtful planter said;
Then look'd upon the slaver's gold,

And then upon the maid.
Hie heart within him w&a at strife

With such accursed gains,
For he knew whose passions gave her life,

Whose blood ran in her veins.
Bat the voice of nature was too weak,

He took the glittering gold;
Then pale as death grew the maiden's cheek,
Her hands as icy cold."

"The heart within " the bosom of this planter must have been
a heart of slow "beat"—not such a heart as Longfellow
ordinarily delights in pourtraying, not such a heart as the
heart of his "Blacksmith." In all respects the position of
the unfortunate Quadroon was deplorable—for, sings the
poet:—

"Her eyes were like a falcon's, gray, - . ~J Her arms and neok were bare;

No garment she wore, save a kirtle gray,
And her own long raven hair."

(If she had a hawk's nose and a swan's neck, she must have
been a most bird-like Quadroon, and was purchased, per-
aunter, by the slaver for his legitimate wife's aviary). More-
puritanical than the American verse maker, Mr. Blatchley'
(who embellishes the song with a striking pictorial frontis-
piece) has olad her decently in a long white gown, with blue
girdle, and scarlet dressings, besides placing bracelets on her
anna, and red and pink roses in her "raven" hair. Mr. Balfe's
music—assuming the form and dimensions of a scena, with
recitatives aud movements in varied tempi—is eminently
dramatic and expressive. It would suit any contralto or
bass singer now before the public, and, delivered earnestly,
could not fail of producing a marked sensation. Our prolific
composer has no doubt felt deeply for the miserable Quadroon,
whose beauty might excite the compassion of even a less
sensitive son of Orpheu3 than the author of "The power of
Love."

Of "Magenta" too—where the words (anonymous?) repre sent the solitary grief of a bereaved girl (whose true-love has been slain in battle), alternated and, at times, combined with the shouts of victory and demonstrations of joy, to which the inhabitants of a disenslaved country give vent outside— Mr. Balfe has (less ambitiously) made a species of dramatic Ktma. His martial touches are confined to imitations of trumpets and reproductions (" transcriptions ?") of trumpetcalls, assigned to the peaceful Benedict or Jules de Glimes of the piano; but with the tender complaints of the unhappy girl, his melody is entirely and appealingly sympathetic Here, again, we have a song fitted alike for contralto or bass, its highest note being D on the fourth line, while the highest note in the " Quadroon-girl" is F on the fifth, of the upper Wave.

"The Poor Orphan Child"—written by R. Lincoln Cocks,

composed by F. Campana (Boosey and Sons). An arietta in the pleasantest aud most unlaboured manner of its agreeable and unlaborious composer—a simple ballad, in short, giving real musical charm to a poetical appeal on behalf of the friendless orphan, from the pen of Mr. Cox, which, if sung to Sig. Campana's melody, at the door of an asylum, would be pretty sure of obtaining admission for any pitiable protege1 (or gie) either, or both, of them might adopt.

"Adieu, dear Home"—words by Richard Bennett, music by E. J. Loder (Boosey and Sons)—is another unpretending ballad, superior even to the one just criticised, combining a graceful and easily-remembered melody with an accompaniment the neatness and propriety of which are alike eminent. The lines of Mr. Bennett, although on a hacknied theme, are simple, healthy, and unaffected.

"The Dew-drop ami the Rose, song for voice and piano "— poetry from the German, music by G. A. Osborne (Duncan Davison and Co.)—is remarkable alike for expression without exaggerated sentiment, and for cleverness without pedantry. (Dr. Johnson, or Mr. Chorley might here interpose— "Sublime without whiskers ?—melancholy without a white waistcoat?" but the "withouts" in this instance are not open to such carping.) Not only is Mr. Osborne's song well written and expressive; it is marked by decided character, and character well sustained throughout, which in a composition or so little pretence is a quality that at once arrests attention. The words, moreover, are so nicely exhibited in their English costume—by a poet (ess ?) who need not have adopted the anonymous—that we are tempted to quote them :—

'* A dew-drop reclined on a beautiful rose,
And whispered soft Tows of his love,
When near that sweet flower to seek soft repose,

A sunbeam fell down from above!'
The dew-drop instinctively felt there had come

A rival—his loved one to prove,
A shelter he sought next the heart of the rose, , •

And whispered soft vows of his love.
Stdl nearer came that sun's bright ray,

As he called the rose his bride.
Those words the dew-nrop heard him say,
Then droop'd his he»d and died."

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

MOZART'S TRIOS.

Silt,—Can you inform me how many original violin trios, by Mozart, are in existence besides the well-known Grand Trio in E flat, Op. 19. My objeot. in asking this is to complete my collection of original violin trios, quartets, and quintets. By publishing this in the Musical World, you will oblige, 8ir, your obedient servant,

Brighton, March 1st. Abtist.

FAIR PLAY.

Sib,—I take the liberty of addressing you, hoping you will allow me a space in your columns, for which I shall feci much obliged.

I played at the competition for the situation of organist at St. Luke's, Chelsea, which took place on Monday the 6th instant, and was returned by the umpires (three in number) as the best player; notwithstanding the organ is not my principal instrument. It would bo out of place to repeat the umpire's report here, as it could do no one but myself any good. HoweVer, three were selected for election—No. 8, first j No. 2, second; and No. 9, third. The election took place on Monday the 20th instant, when Mr. Carter (a resident of Chelsea), the worst of the three, was elected by a large majority. Is it not a most, shameful proceeding to bring a dozen men from different parts of London and elsewhere, to play for an appointment that was virtusllv, if not actually, given to Mr. Carter long before the playing? I, for one, lost a whole day's teaching, Monday being one of my busy days.

One thing, I have not yet mentioned, I think deserves more than

ordinary condemnation; that is, the fact of several of the trustees telling me that they had made up their minds to vote for the bett man. I (from the judgment of the umpires) thought they would vote for me, and, in consequence, made sure of my election. I should not take this ■tep, were this the first time I hare been thus treated in a like affair. I never played in a competition but once before, and being returned by the umpires as the best, and not being elected, I made up my mind never to play in competition again, which resolution I kept until the time that Chelsea became vacant. Should Mr. Carter refer to a competition that took place for St. Helen's, Bishopgate, years back, I answer him in the following terms, "I did not play for it j" that is to •ay, I played one piece, but finding that there was something to play at fight, I declined going on further (having at that time very imperfect sight, which is now, thanks to Mr. Bowman, of Clifford-street, quite perfect). Hoping that you will not find this letter too long, and that you are of my way of thinking—that is, that auch things should be made known, for the good of organists as well as of congregations—I remain, air, yours respectfully, F. Scotson Cube.

4, Union-grove, WandsKorth-road, S., Feb. 29M, 1860.

P.S.—The trustees have not thought 'fit to write to inform me of their decision. "How very business-like I" but what is one to expect? Perhaps they are ashamed of their conduct—and well they may be.

THE BROTHERS HOLMES. Sir,—Having had the great pleasure to make the acquaintance of the English violin virtuosos, the Messrs. Alfred and Henry Holmes, I ought to write yon some lines on this occasion.

Believing it will be interesting for you and the musical public to know the artistical movements of your praiseworthy countrymen, I beg to inform you that they have been for the last two weeks staying here amongst us, during which time they have played at the Court with the greatest success. They so enchanted the King, that after hearing them the first time, he begged them to stay for some days longer, that they might play again at the palace ; and further, by his wish a concert was arranged for them in the Opera-house, which went off most brilliantly. They were recalled with the greatest enthusiasm, after each of the solos and duets which they performed.

Previous to their arrival here they were two months in Copenhagen, where they created a great sensation by their concerts and by their performances in the Society of the Musik-verein. They also gave several concerts in the provinces of Denmark with the greatest success. Therefore the youug artists have sufficiently confirmed the great praise which my cousin the happy deceased senior of the violists Mr. Spohr often had ■pent them ; and on that account my sincere interest for the two brothers will excuse this letter and my bad English therein.

I am, sir, yours truly,
Arnold Wkhner,

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Kapellmeister of his Majesty the King.

MR. RANSFORD'S CONCERT. Sir,—In a letter addressed to you last Monday, I called your attention to several errors in the account civen by one of the morning papers of Mr. Ransford'* annual concert. I now trouble you again to point out that in the Musical World rf last Saturday you have, in your report of this concert, printed the same errors with some additional ones.

Your reporter says: ** The beneficiaire sang, with great spirit, Dibdin's 'Tom Tough,' with other of hif popular ballads, and, with his daughter, the duet,'Oh, tell mc, gentle stranger,' " Ac. Mr. Ransford fang only "Tom Tough" and the duet, not any "other of his popular ballads." 0

Miss Ransford did not (aa stated) sing "an Italian aria," and one or two English songs, but one solo only and the duet. The,fantasia by Ascher, played by Miss Goddard, was not on the "Shadow'song" only, but on several airs from Dinorah; and, finally, Mr. Lazarus did not execute a solo on the clarinet—iu fact, he did not make his appearanoe •t the concert at all.

Your reporter (like he of the morning paper previously alluded to) makes no mention of the fracas caused by the non-appearance of Mr. Sunt Reeves, and of which I gave an account in my previous letter.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, H. T. A.

[Our reporter has not been dismissed.]

ROYAL SOCIETY OF MUSICIANS.

The one hundred and twenty-second anniversary festival, which took place on Thursday evening, at the Freemasons' Hall, was the most successful in our remembrance. In the first place, the assembly was larger than on any former occasion ; in the next, Mr. Charles Dickens, one of the most entertaining and accomplished of chairmen, presided; and lastly, the donations, if they did not exceed that of any previous year, were more liberal than ordinary. The concert, too, was on an unusually ambitious scale, and the dinner, served by Mr. Elkington, a bond fide Freemasons' Tavern repast. The utmost hilarity prevailed throughout the evening, in a great measure due to the president, who was the sun of the festival, and shed a light on all around, and infused warmth into every bosom. Mr. Charles Dickens, to speak in theatrical parlance, made a decided hit. He was voted nem. con. the very best chairman who ever occupied the seat of honour at one of the Society's dinners; and, we have little doubt, if he was installed "perpetual president," it would enhance the prosperity of future festivals, to say nothing of the effect it might have on the general state of affairs. Mr. Dickens is not personally mixed up in musical matters, but on behalf of charity no more appropriate president could be found. No bad specimen of Mr. Dickens's oratorical powers will be found below; but even this admirable impromptu display can convey but a remote idea of his readiness to seize upon a point for illustration, the fertility of his imagination, his piquant style, his logical acumen, and his wonderful powers of accommodating himself to his particular hearers. Moreover—and this is the rarest virtue in a public speaker—he is never diffuse, and consequently never wearies. If copious at times, it is because his matter is abundant and thought flows freely; and, to crown all, we never knew a chairman or president who knew better the exact moment when to speak and when to refrain.

If there was any drawback to the enjoyment of the evening, it was that the first part of the concert was much too long. The practice of giving more than one musical performance after each toast is, we fancy, a mistake. If, instead of fifteen pieces in the first part of the programme, there had been ten, no one would have complained, although ten would have been too many, more especially with such long operatic pieces among them as the recitative and aria, 'Ah! tors' d lui," from the Traviata. The fact that the first part was not over until near eleven is enough to Bhow that the system is wrong. Fortunately there was but one encore (to M iss Arabella Coddard, in Stephen Heller's Improvisation on Mendelssohn's air, "On song's bright pinions, for which "The last rose of summer," of Thalberg, was substituted), or there's no knowing at what unusual hour the concert would have terminated. A good selection, on the whole, was provided, and justified the announcement that "the festival should be considered more in the light of a musical entertainment than a public dinner." This will be at once granted, after perusing the following list of artists, all of whom gave their gratuitous services : — vocalists — Misses Augusta Thompson, Lascelles, Haywood, and Rachel Gray, and Mad. RieHer Schlumberger (soloists) ; with Messrs. R. Barnby, H. Buckland, W. Coward, J. Coward, W. Distin, W. J. Fielding, A. G. Ferrari, Handel Gear, Donald King, F. Kinkee, E. Land, T. Whiffin, T. Williams, Whitehouse, and T. Wallworth, for the madrigals, glees, and chorus ;—instrumentalists—Miss Arabella Goddard, M. Paque, Mr. John Thomas and Mdlle. Sophie Humler—who, at the last moment, volunteered a solo on the violin, and played it capitally in the bargain, and pleased all the amateurs by-her choice of the music. The band was under the direction of Mr. Lazarus, and consisted of sixteen wind and brass players. And to conclude our catalogue, Messrs. James Coward and W. Gr. Cusins presided at the pianoforte.

The royal toasts having been proposed and duly honoured by the company and the musicians, the next on the list was "Prosperity to the Royal Society of Musicians."

Mr. Charles Dickens rose and said: Ladies and gentlemen, I suppose I may venture to say that it is pretty well known to everybody, that all people, whenever they are brought together at a dinner in

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