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TIME LONG PAST

I

LIKE the ghost of a dear friend dead

Is Time long past.
A tone which is now forever fled,
A hope which is now forever past,
A love so sweet it could not last,

Was Time long past.

II

There were sweet dreams in the night

Of Time long past : And, was it sadness or delight, Each day a shadow onward cast Which made us wish it yet might last —

That Time long past.

III

There is regret, almost remorse,

For Time long past.
'Tis like a child's beloved corse
A father watches, till at last
Beauty is like remembrance cast

From Time long past.
Time Long Past. Published by Rossetti, 1870.

BUONA NOTTE

I
“BUONA notte, buona notte!” Come mai

La notte sarà buona senza te?
Non dirmi buona notte, - chè tu sai,
La notte så star buona da

per

sè.

1

II
Solinga, scura, cupa, senza speme,

La notte quando Lilla m'abbandona;
Pei cuori chi si batton insieme

Ogni notte, senza dirla, sarà buona.

III
Come male buona notte si suona

Con sospiri e parole interrotte! -
Il modo di aver la notte buona

E mai non di dir la buona notte.

GOOD

NIGHT

I

GOOD-NIGHT? ah, no! the hour is ill

Which severs those it should unite;

Buona Notte. Published by Medwin in The Angler in Wales, 1834. The text follows Rossetti's version of the Boscombe MS.

Good-Night. Published by Hunt, The Literary Pocket-Book, 1822.

i.-iii. Harvard MS. Mrs. Shelley, 1824.
i. 1 Good-night ? no, love! the night is ill, Stacey MS.

Let us remain together still,

Then it will be good night.

II

How can I call the lone night good,

Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight? Be it not said, thought, understood,

Then it will be good night.

III
To hearts which near each other move

From evening close to morning light,
The night is good ; because, my love,

They never say good-night.
ii. 1 How were the night without thee good, Stacey MS.

iii. 1 The hearts that on each other beat, Stacey MS., The, Harvard MS. cancelled.

iï. 3 Have nights as good as they are sweet, Stacey MS. ii. 4 They || But, Stacey MS.

POEMS WRITTEN IN 1821

DIRGE FOR THE YEAR

I
ORPHAN hours, the year is dead,

Come and sigh, come and weep!
Merry hours, smile instead,

For the year is but asleep.
See, it smiles as it is sleeping,
Mocking your untimely weeping.

II
As an earthquake rocks a corse

In its coffin in the clay,
So White Winter, that rough nurse,

Rocks the death-cold year to-day;
Solemn hours ! wail aloud
For your mother in her shroud. .

III
As the wild air stirs and sways

The tree-swung cradle of a child,
So the breath of these rude days

Rocks the year:- be calm and mild,
Dirge for the Year. Published by Mrs. Shelley, 1824, and dated
January 1, 1821.

ii. 4 death-cold, Mrs. Shelley, 1824 || dead-cold, Mrs. Shelley, 18391

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Trembling hours; she will arise
With new love within her eyes.

IV

January gray is here,

Like a sexton by her grave; February bears the bier,

March with grief doth howl and rave, And April weeps - but, О ye hours ! Follow with May's fairest flowers.

TIME

UNFATHOMABLE Sea! whose waves are years,

Ocean of Time, whose waters of deep woe Are brackish with the salt of human tears! Thou shoreless flood, which in thy ebb and

flow Claspest the limits of mortality,

And sick of prey, yet howling on for more, Vomitest thy wrecks on its inhospitable shore ; Treacherous in calm, and terrible in storm,

Who shall put forth on thee,
Unfathomable Sea ?

Time. Published by Mrs. Shelley, 1824.

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