Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

130

FAREWELL TO DOBB'S FERRY.

him : ver good; he wash him all out wis de turpentime! Ah! if I could only catch him!--I would kick him p-l-e-n-t-y!' “Heavens !' exclaimed JARVIS ; can it be possible that that great picture is spoiled? You must have been in a towering passion when it came home in that condition. "No, no, Monsieur,' replied the Frenchman, in a lachrymose, pitful tone; “I am not strong man to be angry-I was s-2-c-k!'

It is one of those warm, low-cloudy, fine-rainy days of late October. Young KNICK, an hour ago, in a grassy ravine of a hill-side grove, now almost bereft of its summer honors, helped us to brush together a thick bed of faded leaves; and, on that fragrant couch we have been lying, looking off through the thin blue drizzle upon the dying woods over the Tappaan Zee, and the patches of fall-wheat, of matchless green, that edge them, toward the river. Returning, after much pleasant chit-chat with the little Junior, we find a pacquet of letters and communications from town (to which we did not repair to-day) upon our table; and lo! the first one we open is what HALLECK

terms

'A HYMN o'er happy days departed
A hope that such again may be.' '

Our esteemed correspondent has certainly touched us at

FAREWELL TO

TO DOBB'S FERRY.

131

this moment in a tender point. He expresses our sentiments exactly :

"Tis well at times to mope and sigh,

If one can give good reason why;
E'en change of scene may cause (who knows?)
A tear to trickle down one's nose:

I grant ye it is weak to sob

O, very!
Yet must I weep to leave dear DOBB,

His Ferry!'

October's wailing winds are here,
Its foliage pied, and meadows sere;
Gorgeous, with all its bravery on,
Crisping with frosty breath the lawn,
It endeth my gay summer job,

So merry;

And now 'Good-bye to 'Mr. DOBB,

His Ferry!!!

'I shall remember well its shades,

Its CONSTANT-dells and green arcades,

Where murmuring winds on summer eyes
Made music in the trembling leaves;
Those leaves, beneath whose shade the cob-

Bler-sherry
Cemented friendship's chain at 'DOBB,

His Ferry.'

* And now I stand upon the wharf,
While shoots our favorite · ARROW' off;

And still in thought belold afar
The spot where my fond wishes are;

[blocks in formation]

Whoever shall visit ‘DOBB's’ the ensuing winter, and

“ the pleasant domicil which we inhabited there, will on examination find pieces of Old KNICK,' sticking to the doorposts ; retained there in the disparting struggle of the final adieu.

NUMBER SIX.

THE GENTLEMAN IN BLACK; THE STABAT MATER. CONUNDRUMS -A PRAOTI

CAL ONE: A TRIBUTE TO ART ELLIOTT AND INMAN: AN ORIGINAL': A REVEREND JEREMY DIDDLER: A MORNING LOCOMOTIVE IN THE METROPOLIS: AN UNFORTUNATE MEMORY": INFLUENZAL POETRY: A PROFANE

SWEARER

NONPLUSSED: A

TWO-EDGED COMPLIMENT:

A MAN OF THE

WORLD'S ADVICE: SENATORIAL BON-MOT: A MUSICAL ENTHUSIAST: GOD IN NATURE -A COMET: WHAT'S THE LAW?' - AN ANECDOTE.

[ocr errors]

E derive the following capital anecdote from an es

teemed friend who was there, and who never yet permitted a good thing to escape his observant eye. A stagecoach well freighted with passengers, was once travelling from London to York. Among those on the outside was a dry-looking gentleman in rusty black, and very taciturn. According to custom, he soon got a travelling-name from his dress; and from some accidental whim, the passengers seemed to take a pleasure in playing upon it. Whenever they stopped, there would casual questions be asked : "Where's the Gentleman in Black?' Won't the Gentleman in Black come by the fire?' Perhaps the Gentleman in Black would like a bit of the mutton?' In short, the Gentleman in Black became a personage of consequence,

134

THE

GENTLEMAN IN BLACK.

in spite of his taciturnity. At length, in the middle of the night, crash ! went the coach, and the unlucky "outsides' were sent headlong into the ditch. There was a world of work in repairing damages, and gathering together the limping passengers. Just as they were about setting off, the coachman was attracted by a voice from a ditch, where he found some one, white as a miller from rolling down a chalky bank. The Unknown prayed in piteous voice for assistance. "Why who the deuce are you?' cried coachee. *Alas!' replied the other, in a tone half-whimsical, halfplaintive, ' I'm the Gentleman in Black !'

ARE not these lines from the Stabat Mater' felicitously translated? We have the poem entire, but segregate only the two stanzas which ensue:

STABAT mater dolorosa,
Juxta crucem lacrymosan

Dum pendebat filius :
Cujus animam gementem,
Contristantem et dolentem

Pertransivit gladius.

0

quam tristis et afflicta
Fuit illa benedicta,

Mater unigeniti:
Quæ merebat, et dolebat,
Et tremebat; cum videbat
Nati poenas inclyti.

Although nothing could exceed the simple beauty of

« ElőzőTovább »