Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, 2. kötet

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Robert Cadell/John Murray and Whittaker & Company, 1839
 

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226. oldal - He can't remain as he is,' and desired me to ' look to it. ' He then repeated some lines from the Lay, describing the old harper's embarrassment when asked to play, and said, ' This is a sort of thing which I might have expected in painting, but could never have fancied capable of being given in poetry.
39. oldal - ... started in their stalls, stamped, and shook their bridles, the men arose and clashed their armour, and the mortal, terrified at the tumult he had excited, dropped the horn from his hand. A voice like that of a giant, louder even than the tumult around, pronounced these words ; — " Woe to the coward that ever he was born, That did not draw the sword before he blew the horn ! " A whirlwind expelled the horse-dealer from the cavern, the entrance to which he could never again find.
169. oldal - ... house did not observe with perfect equanimity the novel usage to which her chintz was exposed. The Shepherd, however, remarked nothing of all this — dined heartily and drank freely, and, by jest, anecdote, and song, afforded plentiful merriment to the more civilized part of the company. As the liquor operated, his familiarity increased and strengthened ; from " Mr Scott," he advanced to " Sherra," and thence to « Scott," " Walter," and " Wattie,"— until, at supper, he fairly convulsed the...
57. oldal - Scarba's isle, whose tortured shore Still rings to Corrievreken's roar, And lonely Colonsay ; — Scenes sung by him who sings no more ! His bright and' brief career is o'er, And mute his tuneful strains ; Quenched is his lamp of varied lore That loved the light of song to pour ; A distant and a deadly shore Has LEYDEN'S cold remains ! XII.
151. oldal - People may say this and that of the pleasure of fame, or of profit, as a motive of writing, I think the only pleasure is in the actual exertion and research, and I would no more write upon any other terms than I would hunt merely to dine upon hare soup. At the same time, if credit and profit came unlocked for, I would no more quarrel with them than with the soup.
78. oldal - Mightiest of all the beasts of chase, That roam in woody Caledon, Crashing the forest in his race, The mountain bull comes thundering on. Fierce, on the hunter's quiver'd band, He rolls his eyes of swarthy glow, Spurns, with black hoof and horn, the sand. And tosses high his mane of snow.
99. oldal - We have just concluded,' he tells Ellis on his return to Edinburgh, ' an excursion of two or three weeks through my jurisdiction of Selkirkshire, where, in defiance of mountains, rivers, and bogs damp and dry, we have penetrated the very recesses of Ettrick Forest, to which district if I ever have the happiness of welcoming you, you will be convinced that I am truly the sheriff of the " cairn and the scaur." In the course of our grand tour, besides the risks of swamping and breaking our necks, we...
184. oldal - I am rather at a loss regarding the merits of this very important question. How long must a sheep actually measure to come under the denomination of a long theep ?" Mr Brydon, who, in the simplicity of his heart, neither perceived the quiz nor the reproof, fell to answer with great sincerity, — " It's the woo, sir — it's the -woo that makes the difference. The lang sheep hae the short woo, and the short sheep hae the lang thing ; and these are just kind o
328. oldal - tis no laughing matter; little by little, whatever your wishes may be, you will destroy and undermine, until nothing of what makes Scotland Scotland shall remain.
12. oldal - Lewis was fonder of great people than he ought to have been, either as a man of talent or as a man of fashion. He had always dukes and duchesses in his mouth, and was pathetically fond of any one that had a title. You would have sworn he had been a parvenu of yesterday, yet he had lived all his life in good society .... Mat had queerish eyes — they projected like those of some insects, and were flattish on the orbit.

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