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LONDON:
HENRY COLBURN, GREAT MARLBOROUGH ST.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

WHITING, BEAUFORT HOUSE, STRAND. CONTENTS OF THE THIRD PART

f.tai

Social Piracy ..... 1,168,351

Stanzas to the Memory of Burns; written for, and intended to be sung

at the late Festival. By Eliza Cook . . .17

Conversations with the late W. Beckford, Esq. Contributed by va-

rious Friends, Nos. III., IV., V., VI. . . 18,212,418,516

The Miners: a Story of the old Combination Laws. By the Medical

Student . . . . . .25

Reminiscences of the late King of Sweden. By a German Officer in

the Swedish Service . . . . 53

The Robertses on their Travels. By Mrs. Trollope . 60,222,377, 495

Lights and Shades in the Life of a Gentleman on Half-pay. By the

Author of" Stories of Waterloo." Nos. IV., V., VI. . 79,238,523

A Spanish Criminal Case. By C- D. . . . .90

The Refugee. By the Author of" Peter Priggins" . 95

Society for the Encouragement of Hearts. By Laman Blanchard . M>7

Confessions of an Italian Innkeeper . . . .116

Africa in France; or, the Beard and the Pipe . . . 145

The Last of the Contrabbandieri. By L. Mariotti . . 150

The Talleyrand Papers. Nos. VII., VIII., IX. . 180, 313, 473

The Lovers'Rock: a Legend of Andalusia. By Mrs. Romer . 196,303

The Philosophy of Waltzing . . 250, 392

Kitty Dangerous. By the Author of" Peter Priggins" . . 261

On considering Oneself Horsewhipped. By Laman Blanchard . 273

Scenes of Society . . . . . . 28!)

The First Meet of the Season. By the Author of" Peter Priggins" 300, 4i.)

My old Straw Hat. By Eliza Cook . . . .311

The Outcast ; a Tale. By the Medical Student . 330

"Talk of the Devil 1" By Laman Blanchard . . 410

Making Presents. By Laman Blanchard . . . . 441

Song of the Seaweed. By Eliza Cook . . . 448

The recent Meeting of the Coinage at the Royal Mint. (Exclusive

Report) . . • . . .409

A Fragment of a Prose Masque, proposed for presentation at Court on

a late occasion 489

Voices from the Deep; a Yarn. By M. M. M . . . 511

Reminiscences of Talma. By one of his Friends . . . 530

The Duellist's Vow: a Tale for the Times . . . . 545

THE

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

SOCIAL PIRACY;

OB, THE HO VINOS, BOAMINGS, MOTIONS, LOCOMOTIONS, PEKEGBINATION8, POUNCINGS, MANOEUVRES, AND MARAUDINGS, GREAT LARCENIES AND PETTY LARCENIES, OF MR. AND MRS. HAWKE AND THE TEOIiNG HAWKE8.

Our flag's the sceptre all who meet obey.

The ConsAni.

Chap. L

On Land Pirates in General.

There is a piracy not of the high seas, and many a Paul Jones, and many a Lambro, who never boarded a prize or drew a cutlass. These are the corsairs of terra firma—of what the gentlemen of the fourth estate call the "social circle." What family has not felt the grievance of some marauding acquaintance or connexion, if not the heavier visitation of a storming-party of country cousins? In the spirit and morality of the piratical vocation, it makes no difference whatsoever whether it be prosecuted by water, or by land; on the waves of the Mediterranean, or in the squares of Loudon. That of the Algerine is the less formidable of the two. The law of nations is with us, and we can send out an Exmouth with a squadron to bombard and destroy the hold of the robbers. But there is no law, statute or common, to put down cousins! There is no Algerine act to suppress the freebooters who pounce on our dinnertables, and the brigands that infest our bed-chambers. With reference to enemies of this description, it cannot be said with any pretension to truth, that

Britannia wants no bulwarks, although the assertion,

Her home is on the deep, is powerfully supported by the frequent occurrence of spunges (a marine production) in the various comfortable strata of English society. At least, if our homes are not " on the deep," full many a time have we cause to wish that they were so happily located. The laud-pirates could not assail us there, however we might be exposed to the attacks of the "sea-attorneys." The captain of an English ship afloat sits down to dine in his cabin without the fear of any M. De Mangenville before his eyes. No unbidden and unwelcome guests make his brig or sloop "their own," and when he "turns in" for an hour's repose, he finds no impudent relation snoring in his hammock. Contrast the bliss of this state of security with the perils and dangers of the land, where, instead of living, we Sept.—VOL. LXXII. NO. CCLXXXV. B

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