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Thomas A, and Lady B, and Church Organs,
92. The Amateur Society, 161. The Organ,
744. The Philharmenic Society and its
Director, 306. The Philharmonic Society
and Mr. J. B. Cliatterton, 110. The Poor
Tuner at Manchester, 193. The smallest
Beceipt on record, 782. Virginals, The, 782.
War, Weather, and Music, 504. Wagner,
Richard, 189. Weber's Derniere Pen see,
616.

Costa, Signor, 499,528

Croft,». Lumley, 60,103,760, 777

Cruvelli, Marie, 26

Cruvelli, Sophie, 9,161,398,451, 834, 835

Deaths, 104,120, 200, 612, 772

Dejean, Madame Julienne, 791

Departures for the Continent, 528

Der FreyschQtz " Redirmis," 35

Do Beasts like Music P 785

Don Giovanni, 342

Donizetti, 617

Dramatic Gossip, 109, 122, 140,173,189,199,

215
Drury Lane Theatre and Mr. E. T. Smith, 81
Duke of Cambridge in Paris, 760
Duprez, M., 699

Ella, Mr., Lectures, 347

Erard, Monsieur, 549

Ernst, Herr, 35, 343, 455, 806

Exeter Hall, 693

Eva, the Ballet of, 283, 300, 307, 327, 338

Farren, Mr. W., 455, 468, 746

Perraris, Amalia, 792

Festival of the Three Choirs, 395, 5G5

Fashions a la Rachel, 693

Favante, Mdlle. Rita, 747

Field and Hummell, 600

Pish with Musical Scales, 372

Fobeion—Ail la Chapelle, 139, 570, 633, 663.
682,695 ; Amsterdam, 13, 22, 67, 87 ; Bad
Gastein, 570; Baden, 556; Baden-Baden.
515, 656, 635; Barcelona, 165, 333; Bar
men, 317; Berlin, 13, 22, 37, 54, 87,102,
119,135, 149, 165, 183, 198, 213, 230, 247,
263, 279, 292, 317, 332, 359, 377, 402, 451
472, 484, 522, 631, 549, 570, 591, 635, 643
663, 695, 728, 746, 762, 779, 794, 809
Berne, 587; Blankenberg, 279; Bordeaux
135, 647, 795; Boston, 21, 727;- Bra
ail, 643; Bremen, 22, 87, 318, 791
Brcslau, 166, 359, 494, 556, 643, 775, 810;
817; Bromberg, 214, 556; Brunswick, 103
166, 318, 359, 377, 472, 556, 728,
758, 820; Brussels, 23, 102, 118, 165,
180, 198, 601, 794 j Bucharest, 631
Carlsruhe, 332, 472, 728; Cassel, 431
Chemnitz, 782; Coblentz, 87; Coburg, 22.

i 747,820; Cologne, 13,14,22, 64,86,118,166
182,198, 231, 278, 332, 350, 472, 523, 670.
693, 635, 695, 746, 779; Copenhagen, 23.
119, 292; Cracow, 231, 268; Crefeld, 523 j
Dantsic, 37, 87, 150, 198, 252, 279, 333,
695; Darmstadt, 23, 54,150, 263, 377, 442
747; Dessau, 103, 119, 166, 183, 231, 292;
Dieppe, 623 j Dresden, 13, 22, 87, 118, 135,
149, 231, 279, 292, 317.JI59, 505, 655, 683,
740, 807; Dusseldorf, 279, 317, 402, 484
Elberfeldt, 13, 333; Elbing, 359,663; Ems
400, 522; Erfurt, 13, 135, 214, 523, 811;
Florence, 292, 451, 643; Frankfort-on-the
Maine, 13, 22, 87, 135, 150, 215, 231, 252
263, 318, 332, 411, 680, 683, 728, 747
Genoa, 292, 376; Geneva, 327, 451, 728
Gera, 103, 695; Ghent, 439; G6rlitz, 183
Gotha, 119, 166, 252, 626, 728 j Gratz,

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Grisi, Carlotta, 835

Grisi and Mario in America, 9, 11, 26, 68, 99

Grisi and Mario's Return to England, 154

Gregorio, Signor, 628

Guedenoff, General, 190

Guernsey, Captain Wellington, 329

Gye, Mr. F., 154, 186

Hale, Mr. W. P., 464

Halle, Mr. C, 150, 345

Harris, Mr. A., 174

Hawes, Miss M. B., 219

Hayes, Miss Catherine, 60, 116, 219

Haydn's " Creation" and Mrs. Stowe, 78

Heinefetter, Madame Stockl, 602

Hereford Musical Festival 301, 542, 562 j

Her Majesty and the Theatres, 122

Her Majesty at the French Exhibition, 552

Hill, Mr. H., 282

Horton.Misa P. "Illustrative Gatherings," 222

How to take Sebastopol, 458

How to get rid of Recalls, 694

Hummel's, J. N., Account of his own Life, 27

Huerta, the Guitarist, 703

Hummel and Field, 600

Improvement in Church Music, 94

Individuality in Music, 7

International Copyright (England and Bel-
gium), 93

Isaacs, Master, 327

Italian Art in France and Theatrical Journalism
in Italy, 479

Italian Opera at Liverpool, 490

Joachim, Joseph, 34, 755

Joachim, J., and Schumann, Clara, 61

Julie, Mdlle., 792, 806

Jullien, 65, 154, 471, 487, 616

Jnllien in the Provinces, 534, 550, 670, 822

Jullien's Concerts, 10, 25, 42, 68, 76,726, 735,

742, 758, 775, 790, 806, 823
Jullien's Bal Masque, 822

Eeeley, Miss Mary A., 219
Kell, Mr., the Blind Organist, 138
Kemble, Mrs. Fanny, 59, 90
Kidderminster Musical Festival, 679
Erall, Mdlle., 284

Lake, Mr.George, and the Liverpool Organ, 597

Lavigne and Nourrit, 575

Leading Abticles:
Ander, Herr, 725; Anderson, Mr., 360; An
Organist and Organ Building, 233; A Letter
of Square Toes, 312; Beethoven's Ninth
Symphony and the Examiner, 232; Bennett,
Mr. W. S., and the Conductorship of th»
Philharmonic, 788; Benefit Concerts, 121 j
Benevolent Fund of the Sacred Harmonic
Society, 184; Best, Mr. W. T., and the
Panopticon, 397 j Bishop, Sir Henry, 162,
280, 296, 312; Bennett, Mr. W. 8., and
English Composers, 296; Berlioz and Wag-
ner, 379 ; Birmingham Musical Festival, 433,
532, 596; Cherubini, 104; Crystal Palaoe
Band, 677; Copyright, 298; Conservatory
of Musio at Cologne, 740, 756; Costa, M.,
and Bennett, Mr. W. S., 154; Costa, M.,
Oratorio of Eli, 612; Dearth of Musical
News, 628; Eggis, M. Etienne, and Mendels-
sohn, 501; Ella, Mr. and his Eloquence, 453;
English Opera, 136; Farren, Mr. W„ 468;
Grisi and Mario's Return to England, 170;
Harmonic Union, 8, 72, 820; Hereford
Musical Festival, 485; Her Majesty's Private
Band, 201, 216, 218, 232, 248, 845; Italian
Opera (The) in Paris, 582; II Conte Ory

and L'Europe Artiste, 298; Jullien's Con-

certs, 709, 805; L'Ktoile da Nord, 435;

Libel on Jullien and Co., 453; Limited Lia-

bility Bill and English Composers, 486; Lind,

Jenny, 772; Lindley, Robert, the Violon-

cellist, 380; Meeting of the Three Choirs,

433; Mendelssohn's Testimonial, 378; Mario,

Signor, in a scrape, 662; Mendelssohn's

St. Paul, 137; Meyerbeer's visit to England,

396; Meyerbeer's Departure, 484; Meyer-

beer and M. Costa, 517; Meyerbeer's

"Etoile du Nord " and Mr. E. T. Smith, 152;

Monster Organ at Liverpool, 361; Musical

Union (The) and Criticism, 281; Musio at

tho Crystal Palace, 137; Musicsellers'

Announcements, 153; Musical Festivals and

the Railways, 564; National Opera Com-

pany, 644, 676, 708, 725; New Philhar-

monic Society, 468; Nitoeris at Drury Lane,

661; Our Provincial Correspondents and

their Criticisms, 596; Panopticon Organ, 9,

25; Panopticon and Mr. W. T. Best, 896;

Philharmonic Society, 41, 56, 57, 200, 468,

486,517, 548,692,788; Piccolomini, Mdlle.,

821; Praeger, Professor, 328, 361, 897;

Professional Chorus Singers, 24, 40; Rachel,

500, 516, 822; Ratcatcher's Daughter, The,

709; Reach, Mr. Angus, and the Amateur

Performance, 202; R6-union des Arts, 58;

Rolle, Jean Henri, 105; Royal Italian Opera,

120, 217, 249, 264; St. George's Hall, Liver-

pool, 773; Society of British Musicians,
804; Strakosh, Herr, of New York, 73;
The Conversations with Rossini, by
F. Hiller, 724; The Leader and Signor Verdi,
282; Tho Morning Post and Verdi, 314;
The Morning Post and Signor Costa, 581;
Three Nightingales, 105; Verdi, 313, 344,
455; Viardot, Mad., and Sig.Verdi's Trova-
tore, 168; Wagner, Richard, 88, 170, 185,
299,412,613,660,832

Learn to write and don't learn to write, 94

Leave to Play Shakspere, 759

Les Vepres Siciliennes, 443

Lesueur, Madame, 330

Lesueur, The Composer, 650

L'Etoile du Nord, 61, 479, 533, 742

L'Europe Artiste, 435, 451

Leusden, Mdlle. Anna, 824

Lind, Jenny, 161, 647, 823

Lind, Jenny, and Mr. Mitchell, 824, 831

Lind, Jenny, versus Italy, 778

Lindley, Robert, 393, 464

Liszt, Herr P., 394,417

Litolff, Henry, 6

Liverpool Philharmonic Socictv and Mr. Sud-

low, 75

Lohengrin, 225, 242, 257, 277

Lola Montes, 51

Look nt Home, 269

Lover t>. Davidson, 261

Love's Souvenir, 29

Lucombc, Mr. T., 138

Lumley, Mr., 411

Macnamara, Mrs., 792, 806

Macready, Mr., 116

Managerial Bulls, 194

Manuscripts of Mozart, 662

Mara, Madame, Sketch of, 17

Mario, Signor, 742, 822, 835

Marriages, 120, 152, 200, 312, 500

Marseillaise, The, 691

Mathews, Mr. C, 250

Meeting of Charity Children at St. Paul's, 366

Mehemet AH Pacha's Daughter and the 10th

Hussars, 301

Mendelssohn Fund, 34

Mendelssohn and the Parisian Critics, 193

Messiah, The, 824

Meyerbeer, 55, 99, 186, 227, 435, 458, 464,

473, 483, 484, 487,515, 629, 552

Minasi, Mr. Antonio, 778
Minnie, 633

Mitohel, Mr., and French Plays, 138
Modern Literaturo, 668
Morning Concerts (in 1750), 188
Movement in C (Division), 490
Mozart's " Don Giovanni," 718, 738,752, 767,

785, 802, 814

Mozart Institution, The, 487

Muller, Mr. Robert (Death of), 602

Murray, Mr. E., 806

Murray, Mr. and Mrs. Leigh, 711

Musicians should study Intercourse, 731

Music in Holland, 66

Music wedded to Drama, 727

Musio in the Provinces, 21

Music laid on like Gas, 55

Music of the Political Spheres, 55

Music of the Tartars, 139

Musical Festivals, 629
Musical Gossip, 694, 711, 725

Nan, Mdlle., 533

Negri, Signor, L., 881

Newcombe, Mr., 434

New Philharmonic Society, 94, 250

News for Sims Reeves, 342

New Arrivals, 277

Ney, Mdlle. Jenny, 233

Nicholson, Mr. (organ builder), 607

Nisbett, Mrs., 455

Non Poma Natamus, 635

Norton, Mrs., and Rachel, 521

Norwich Musical Festival, 675, 742

Notice, 832

Noun-it and Lavignc, 575

Obituary, 104, 120, 200, 612, 772

Odoardo c Cristina, 705

Of the Abuses of Music, 736

Opera at Drury lane, 641

Opera Bank of England, 490

Opera and Drama, by Richard Wagner, 307,

322, 339, 355, 372, 391, 407, 437, 445, 461,

481, 496, 510, 526, 545, 566, 675, 699, 608,

631, 638,654, 674, 697, 706, 722, 736, 751,

770, 784, 801, 819

Opera and Drama in Germany, 602

Opera and Orchestra, 156

Organ, 35, 82, 84, 130, 236, 584, 694, 659,

677, 715, 744

Organ, opening a new one at Clayton, 731

Organ of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, 798

Original Letter of Jenny Lind, 252

Osborne, Mr. G. A., 261

Pacini, Signor, 202

Paganini, 28

Palmyra and Paola, Mdlles., 395

Panopticon, 28, 199, 667, 693, 825

Faradies, Madame Theresa, 253, 263

Parisian Musical Mems., 211

Peculiarities of Musicians, 474

Pergolese, J. II., 624

Perfumed Letter-Box (The), 687

Philharmonic Society and Mr. G.F. Flowers, 34

Piccolomini, Mdlle, 817,835

Pierini, Signor, 310

Piracy in the Colonies, 38

Ploying People out, 443

Pleycl, Madame, 628

Polytechnic Institution and Her Majesty's

Visit, 300

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lomew, Mrs. Mounscy, 730. Baynham, T.'
769. Beddoe, A., 780. Benedict, Jules'
460, 810. Berger, P., 467, 477, 787, 788'
810. Best, W. T., 431. Borrow, W., 11"
Braine, W. Rn 477. Brooks, W., 787'
Browne, Corporal J., 431. Campana, Signor'
55. Cheshire, J., 776, 787. Chipp, E. T.'
467. Christine, Louise, 11. Clinton, J.'
431. Cole, J. P., 787. Compton, C. II., 39'
Conversations on Harmony, 743. Costa's'
Signor, Portrait, 523. Crowdey, F., 477'
Cusins, W. G., 467. D'Egville, Louis, 825-
Engel, 836. Douglas, J. P., 321. Dnnstan'
J. M., 11. Durner, J., 787. Kgghard, Jules'
29. Ellerton.J. L.,787,810. Ewer,Carl,ll-
Fitzwilliam, F., 743. Fowlo, T. L., 431,477-
Gilbert, B., 477. Glover, C. W., 55. Goll-
mick, A., 236, 759, 810. Guglielnio, P. D.
810. Gumbert, F., 91. Gungl, J. 477,
Hiindal, 235. Hatton, J. L., 450,810. Ile-
mans, Mrs., 450. Hempel, C. F., 39, 743.
Hills, John, 11. Holloway, A. S., 759.
Holmes, E., 810. King, R., junior, 787.
Kruger, 743. Kucken, F., 91. Langen, Ma-
thilda, 450. Laurent, H., 759. Leslie, H.,
39. Lichtenstein, G., 29,743. Lindpaintner,
P., 29. Lindridge, G., 39. Linley, G.,321,
450, 730. Longdcn, W. G., 730. Lowe, J.,
776. Macfarren, G. A., 321, 450. Mackay,
C, 343,730. Manns, 837. Majnard, Walter,
450. Matthey, A.,39. Mendelssohn, 431,731.
Minasi, Antonio, 743. Molique, B., 29, 825.
Moore, 0, 91. Mori, F., 321. Mudie.T.M.,
810. Naumann, T. W., 743, 759, 776, 788.
Neate, 836. Oberthur, C, 787. Orpheus, 776.
Oury, Madame, 450. Palmer, Miss, 743.
Philp, Miss E., 236, 825. Prout, T. J., 730.
R. G. E. L., 39. Rea, W., 787. Eichards,
Brinley, 776. Eobinson, Mrs. Joseph, 467.
Eoyal Midlothian Yeomanry Galop, 743.
Eussel, G., 730. Salaman, C, 477. Scars-
brook, T., 236. Sohallehn, H., 477.
Schloesser, A., 467. Schultz, E., 91. Sowell,
J., 477. Sieber, F., 29. Silas, E., 450.
Sloper, 836. Smith, G. T, 39. Stanley,
G., 431, 467. Stella, Alfred, 776. Stret-
ton, (!., 321. Szeepanowska, Julie de,
730. T.M. J., 467. Talexy, A., 769. Til-
leard, J.,39. Verdi, G., 730. Wagner, E.,
290. Wallace, W. V., 730. Williams, S.,
810.

Eichards, Mr. and Mrs. Brinley, 35

Riatori, Madame, 533, 677

Roberts, Mr. Biohard, 465

Eobinson, Mrs. Joseph, 443

Eoger, M., 14

Eonconi, Signor and Madame, 52

Eonconi, Signor, 282, 268

Roqueplan, M., 662

Eossini, 607, 647, 835

Rossini and Bosio, 363

Eossini and Braham, 227

Eossini and Meyerbeer, 251

Eossini's Stabat Mater at St. George's
Cathedral, 199

Eossini and the Cologne Chorus, 651

Eossini and the Opera, 343

Eoyal Gallery of Illustration, 138

Eoyal Opera, Drury Lane, 150, 211

Eoyal Italian Opera, 75, 211

Eoyal Society of Female Musicians, 28

Eoyal Society of Musicians, 154, 172

Rudersdorff, Madame, 233

Russian Songs, 106

Russians in Covent Garden, 478

Salaman's, Mr. Charles, Amateur Choial
Society, 776, 823

SaJaman's, Mr. Charles, Musical Lectures, 26

38, 150, 174, 311, 394, 711
Sale of old Violins, 277
Sohott, J. J., 119

Schumann, Madame Clara-Wieok, 154, 755
Scraps from an Amateur's Common-place

Book, 61, 76, 93, 119
Scribe, 473
SiTori, Signor, 502
Sick and Wounded at Scutari, 225
Singing and Moustnchios, 440
Smith, Albert, Mont Blanc, 285, 791
Smith, Mr. O., Death of, 89
Smith, Mr. G. Townshend, 711
Sontag, Madame, 116
Spark, M., Presentation of a Testimonial to,

190
Spontini, 642, 655, 672, 690, 707
Stabbacli, Miss, 10
Steggall, Dr., 471, 742
Stanley, Miss Emma, "Seven Ages of Woman,"

806
Stolen Music Paper, 55
Stoltz, Rosina, 4

St. Matthew's Church, City Road, 629
St. Marc, Mdlle., 266
St. George's Hall, Liverpool, 295, 318, 547,

648
Subscriptions for 1856,832
Sunday Music, 688

Surrey Zoological Gardens, 375, 435, 470, 487
Swiss Ranz des Yaches, 817

Tamberlik, Signor, 774
Ternan, Miss Fanny, 295
Thalberg, 571, 774, 817

Theatres.

Adelpld.—Janet Pride, 90. La Bayadere, 108.
New version of Valentine and Orson, 731.
Mr. Webster's return, 791. Pantomime, 885

Covent Garden, Royal Italian Opera.—II
Conte Ory, 233, 249, 264. Fidclio, 249,
264, 283. Ernani, 265, 283. L'Elisir
d'Amore, 283, 293. II Trovatore, 293, 809,
329, 383, 415, 435. Le Prophcte, 502, 518.
I Puritani, 309, 329. La Favorita, 329,
435. Norma, 346, 364. Don Giovanni,
346, 364. Huguenots, 364, 502. U
Barbiere, 383. I/Etoile du Nord, 469,
487, 502, 518. Eva, 264, 283, 829. Don
Pasquale, 415. La Vivandiere, 415. Otello,
518. Resume of the Season, 518. The
Pantomime, 774, 835

Drury Lane.—L'Etoile du Nord, 139. Open-
ing of the Eoyal Opere, 232. La Sonnam-
bula, 250, 310. II Barbiere, 265, 283.
Les Cosuques, 267. An Impudent Puppy,
727. Mr. Aguilar'e Benefit, 283. Don
Pasquale, 293. Amateur Performance be-
fore the Queen, 801. Norma, 342. Lucia,
365. Lucrezia Borgia, 365. Mdlle. Pal-
myra, 365. Terpsichore, 877. Miranda,
440. DonnadelLago,440. Madame Gassier's
Benefit, 448. Bohemian Girl, 482. Nitocris,
667. Mr. C. Mathews, 667; Pantomime, 835

Haymartcet,—Romeo and Juliet, 74,285. Guy
Mannering, 108. The Spanish Dancers,
140. Fra Diavolo, 266. Bohemian Girl,
285. Actress of Padua, 295. Lucia, 310.
Lady of Lyons, 363. Berts, or the Gnome of
Hartzbcrg, 365. Sims Reeves's Benefit, 411.
Busy-body, 440. Wife or no Wife, 482.
Miss Blanche Fane in "Court Favour," 556.
Olympus in a Muddle, 556. Mr. and Mrs.
Sims Reeves, 219. The Sultan, 629. The
Little Treasure, 667. The Beginning and
the End, 713. Mr. Buckstono's Return,
791; Pantomime, 836

Lyceum.—Too much of a good Thing, 123.
Take that Girl away, 155. Crown Diamonds,
310.

Marylebone.—Leon of the Iron Mask, 90.

Olympic.—Louis XI., 35. Angus Reach's
Benefit, 220. The Welsh Girl, 285. School
for Scandal, 440. Mr. Robson's Benefit,
448. Five PoundsJReward, 791. Pantomime,
835

Princesies.—Louis XI., 44. Henry VIII., 310.

Sadler'i JPeWs.—Lyceum Company, 235. Mr.
Webster and Madame Celeste, 295. The
Hunchback, 602. Hamilton of Iiothwell-
haugh, 693.

St. Jamet's.—Mrs. Seymour's management.—
Clarissa—Art, 123. La Czarina, 155. M.
LevuBSOr, 377. Mdlle. Rachel, 499, 516.

Strand.—Mr. Leighton Walter's deT>ut, 60.
The Crioket on the Hearth, 189. Xing
Queer, 235. Mr. Stirling's Benefit, 747.
Daughter of the Regiment, 286. Miss Julia
Bleaden, 295. Sally Smart, 342. Miss
Rebecca Isaacs'e Benefit, 451. The Heir-at-
Law, 667. Burlesque on Nitocris, 693.

Soho.—Italian Opera, 742. Lucia, 757.

Surrey.—Mr. Phelps, 295. Lady of Lyons
342. Love Chase, 312. Sonnambula, 440
The Wife, 629.

Theatricals at San Fraucisoo, 735

Theatricals in Australia, 771

The First Singer going—not gone, 602

The Grand Opera in 1713 at Paris, 603

The Messiah and the Creation, 126

The Overture, 775

The real Bull caught by the Horns, 109

The Riots at Jullien's, 735

The smallest Receipt on record, 774

The Voice, 666

Thillou, Madame Anna, 300

Touch, as applied to the Fingers and the In-
Btrument, 474

Transatlantic Journalism, 440

Treffz, Madlle. Jetty, 282, 363, 381

Triumph of Rachel, 531

Trumpeters, 668

Trust, Mr., 9

Tutton, Mr. J. R., 448

Two Opinions, 87, 211

Two Songs, by Richard Wagner, 290

Ugalde, Madame, 173, 395

Vatel, M., 186

Verdi, 227, 472, 473, 479,628, 835

Viardot, Madame, 549

Vieuztemps, 435

Vivier, 114, 199, 434, 451, 514, 635

Wagner, Herr, 268, 339, 251, 884, 417, 435,

490,517,629,627
Wallace, Mr. W. V., 138
Wallachian Music, 93
Walter, Mr. Leighton, 60, 363
Weber's Euryanthe and Derniere Pensee, 601
Weber, Franz, Silberno Hochzeit, 13
Wieck, Madame Clara Schumann, 35
Willey, Mr. 737
Windsor Castle, Performance of Sacred Music

at, 11
Winter, P., 125

Woodin's, Mr., Entertainment, 311
Wo und Wann, 487
Write me down a Record, 602

Yankeo Church Music, 261

Young Germany and Richard Wagner, (29

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NOTICE.

The Proprietors beg to announce that, in consequence of the increasing circulation of the Musical World in London, they will be compelled to discontinue its delivery to all their subscribers in town, after-^ present number.

The Publishers have given^J,h£ir list of subscribers to Mr. Reed, the well-knowrpWcws Agent in John Street, (Oxford Street) who has undertaken to supply the Musical World to residents in all parts of London. All applications respecting unstamped subscriptions, must therefore be made to Mr. Reed.

The Publishers request that all accounts due to Christmas may be paid to them without delay, as the future supply of the Musical World will not be continued to those subscribers whose payments are in arrear.

The stamped edition (for the country) will bo still forwarded from the publishing office, but only to those subscribers who pay a quarter in advance.

PARIS.
(Irom'our own Corretpondtnt.)

Paris, December 26M, 1854. Once more in annual rotation has Christmas returned to gladden the hearts and humanise the feelings of all good Christians on either side the Channel. Yule logs and sea-coal fires in London—midnight mass and solemn service in Paris; roast beef, plum-pudding, turkeys, and other solid comestibles with you—etrennes, bonbons, and all sorts of prettinesses here. And yet is the heart saddened and the eye dimmed in many a household and by many a hearth of merry England and lighthearted France. How few have not lost some old familial'friend or some dearer relation, in the perils by water and the perils by fire, in the din of battle, or by the pestilence that walketh in darkness. Mourning for the dead, fear for the living, temper the mirth and festivity of this happy and holy season. The thoughts of all, from the monarch to the peasant, are with those

"Brave hearts, to Britain's pride So faithful and so true;" and those

"Cull'd and choice-drawn cavaliers of France,"— who in storm and tempest, in privation and sickness, are fighting the battle of the weak against the strong, the right against the wrong-doer, the oppressed against the oppressor; who, regardless of numbers aud heedless of odds, are defending the cause of civilisation against barbarism, and by their undaunted bearing

driving back the countless Huns of the new Attila of the North.

Surely at such a time, when

"All the youth of England are on fire,
And silken dalliance in the wardrobe lies;
When thrive the armourers, and honour's thought
Reigns solely in the heart of every man,"

a short digression is pardonable, and some expression of feeling, however weak, is permissible, in honour of those but for whom music and the kindred arts might be numbered with the dead. Let the Musical World and its readers—all unpolitical as they are—join in the chorus of praise and thanksgiving to that baud of brothera, French and English, to whom they owe the peace and comfort of their hearths, the glory of their country, and the preservation of those arts -which distinguish the man from the brute, the English or Frenchman from the Cossack and the Muscovite.

The past week has been marked by more than a usual amount of novelty in the musical world of Paris, and, as the Emperor and Empress honoured with their presence last Saturday the first representation of Verdi's opera of II Trovatore, I will begin with the Italian Opera. The production of this work for the first time here excited a considerable amount of curiosity, and the house was full to sufTocatioD. The music is in Verdi's usual style; the brass instruments roar so as to endanger your tympanum, and in one chorus the orchestra is assisted by a band of blacksmiths, who with large hammers perform an ad libitum accompaniment on enormous anvils. What more could the most strenuous admirer of energetic music require? Signor Verdi, however, has been happy in the artists who introduced his opera to a Parisian audience. Signor Baueardo made his debut on our stage as the Troubadour, and achieved an unquestionable and well-deserved success. His first song behind the wings obtained great applause, and his voice is flexible, vigorous, and sweet. He acts with judgment and discretion, and now that Mario has disappeared, (at least for a season), and tenors are scarce, Signor Baucard6 is a most valuable acquisition to the Italian lyric stage. Let Mr. Gye look to him. Madame Borghi-Mamo, as the Boh6mienne, shewed herself a good artist and an accomplished musician. Her voice is clear and well-toned; her style pure, and her vocalisation excellent. One of her airs was unanimously encored, and the whole of the music received ample justice at her hands. Madame Frezzolini is not so young as she was some few years since; and her voice, mellifluous and clear in the upper register, is wanting in the lower notes. She acted the part of Leonore in a most impassioned spirit, and showed all her well-known ability both as actress and vocalist. In the fourth act she was much applauded, twice recalled, and loaded with bouquets. Sig. Gassier filled a small part with judgment and discretion, and Sig. Graziani astonished all the house, and probably himself as

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much as any, by displaying great powers as an actor; in many scenes he exhibited strong indications of possessing no small portion of the genius of Roncoui. Du reste, the opera was mounted in magnificent style and at lavish expense. Nearly the whole of the action takes place at night, and the libretto is more obscure than the time it represents. M. Ragani, however, determined that no material aid should be wanting to success, and accordingly gave unlimited orders for new grottoes, decorations, palaces, gardens, dungeons, cascades, and a new moon which had never done business elsewhere, and played a most important part on this occasion. The orchestra, under Signor Bonetti, was above all praise; the choruses excellent. Finally, Signor Verdi, who had personally superintended the rehearsals, was called for three times, and honoured by reoeiving a bouquet thrown by the fair hand of the Empress herself. I trust this opera may be the means of turning the tide in M. Ragani's favour, for until now he has had a most sorry season, and must have been a heavy loser by his operatic speculation.

Madame Ugalde made her rentrke at the Opera-Comique on Saturday, in Qalathte. She met with a most favourable reception from a very full house, and was unanimously encored in the Bacchic song of the second act. She displayed all those qualities, as actress and vocalist, which have so deservedly made her a favourite with the Parisian public, and all the world is delighted to see her return to her old house at the pleasant little OperaComique. She will enable Caroline Duprez to get an occasional rest from the faiigues of L'EloiU du Nvrd, which shines as brightly as ever.

Our first masked ball at the Op6ra also took place on Saturday, under the direction of M. Strauss. The performance commenced at ten o'olock, with the production by the orchestra of several pieces from the "Album Strauss," and at twelve o'clock dancing began. The house was more full than select, and, indeed, it was difficult to say whether the orchestra or the company were most noisy. Each seemed engaged in a perpetual attempt to drown the other, and the result was the production of sounds more loud than mellifluous.

Madlle. Sophie Cruvelli has been suffering from a severe domestic affliction, and did not sing for ten days until Wednesday last. She then again appeared in Les Huguenots, and with the invariable result of a house crammed to the roof by an audience who hardly know how to testify their rapturous applause. During her absence, La Muette de Portici was played four times, but neither singers nor mime made any advance in public estimation.

In construoting the libretto of Le Muletier de Tolide, the ingenious and accomplished authors, Messrs. Dennery and Clairville, seem to have taken the measure of their composer and to have written to order. There is literally not a new situation or a scintilla of originality in the whole piece, which is a melange of Le Jeu de VAmour et du Hasard, Les Diamans de la Couronne, and Jean de Paris. The authors themselves admit this, and one of the characters informs the audience of their palpable plagiarisms. You shall judge for yourself,—here is the plot. The Queen of Leon has been chosen as the future wife of the Infante de Castille, and hearing that the latter is desirous of seing his intended before completing the match, and has disguised himself as a peasant for that purpose, she, in her turn, assumes the dress of a Spanish peasant girl, and sets out on her travels to discover her disguised lover in posse. One of her maids of honour, attired in like guise, alone accompanies hex; but, arrived at the first posada, they are attacked by a

band of roysterers, who admire their pretty faces, and desire a more intimate acquaintance. They are rescued by a muleteer gaily attired and courteoas in bearing, who drives off the molesters and rescues the ladies. The Queen is convinced that the muleteer can be no other than the disguised Infante, and without discovering her incognito thanks him for his services. At the next venta they have to deal with men of a different class, but of similar tastes. Don Pedro, cousin of the Queen, who has sworn to marry her, or cause her abdication, is drinking with a choice lot of boon companions. At the sight of the two pretty maidens they take them by the waist^ and are about to proceed to further extremities, when the mtfleteer (the deus ex machind) again appears, again rescues them, is again thanked by the Queen, who again preserves her incognito, and (still disguised) places herself under the protection of Don Pedro: whereupon the first act ends. The second act opens in the palace of the Queen, who, in full regal attire, is seated on her throne. The courtiers pass before her, and a door is thrown open, through which the more common herd are allowed to enter and make an obeisance to their sovereign. Among the rest the muleteer comes forth, and the Queen recognizes and is charmed with him. Don Pedro, also, is there, and, having instructed one of his accomplices to carry off her majesty when she leaves the palace, is overheard by the muleteer, who informs the sovereign, and she thereupon directs her camerara-major to take her place in the carriage, while she remains at the palace to watch the conspirators Don Pedro's plan is to bring forward fehe yomng peasant who has placed herself under his protection, and who so closely resembles the queen, to place her on the throne and procure her signature to an abdication, while the true queen is kept in confinement. Meanwhile, the Queen has again assumed her peasant dress, the muleteer is again at her side and makes protestations of love, which she, supposing him to be the Infante, readily accepts. They are surprised by Don Pedro, who is confused between the peasant and the Queeu, and knows not whether the lady before him be one or the other, or both. He knows, however, that the muleteer is not the Infante, and thinks that if the lady be really the Queen she will be as thoroughly lost by marrying a muleteer as by any other process. The Queen accepts the proposal with joy, and the marriage takes place: which ends Act II.

Returned from church, the Queen thinks it time to put an end to the comedy. "Now then," says she to the muleteer, "you have played your part admirably, but it is time for the muleteer to give place to the Infante." "I am not the Infante, replies he," that gentleman is a married man." The Queen bursts into tears; the muleteer is delighted; he is loved for himself alone. ■ No," says he, " I am not the Infante, I am the King!" End of Act III.

Thus much for the libretto, which, though jar-fetched and borrowed, is not wanting in situation. The music of M. Adolph Adam has been sought from sources as various, and frequently as well known, as the words of Messrs. Dennery and Clairville. Though they have not drawn on their imagination for their plot, he most certainly has tasked his memory for his music. Worn out Spanish boleros, stale Frenoh airs, and old-fashioned English melodies, have supplied his inspiration. To him every fountain is Castalian, provided it be not dry, and no matter how often it has lieen drained and dirtied by previous composers. Even his admirers admit that the Muletier de Tolide is inferior to Le Bijou Perdu, and declare that no air will have the success of " Lea Fraises." The overture is weak and trashy, being

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