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EW SONGS BY M. W. BALFE. —

"Si tu savats comme je t'aiine" ... M 3s.

"The Banner of St. George " (Defence and not Defiance] ... 3i.

"I'm not in love, remember" It. 6d.

"Oh ! take me to thy heart again" 2s. Gd.

"If I could change as others chauge" Ire. fid.

"Fresb as»Rose" ... ... ... ... 3s.

"I lore you" 3s.

"Mary'' 3s.

London: Duncan Davison & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

EW PIANOFORTE MUSIC BY BLUMENTHAL.

The days that are no more" (Transcription) ... 3s.

Un petit Cadeau" (Bluette) 3s.

London: Doncan Damson & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

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THE AIRS, BALLADS, FANTASIAS, QUADRILLES, WALTZES, &C. IN THE OPERETTA OF

"ONCE TOO OFTEN."

COMPOSED BY HOWARD CLOVER.
Performed with the greatest success at the Theatre Royal, Drury Laoe.

11 Oh! Glorious Age of Chivalry." Duet Sung by Mile. Jenny Back and

Miss Emma Hbywood

"The Solemn Words his Lips have spoken." Grand Air. Sung by Mile.

Jenny Bach «. w

"The Love you've slighted." Ballad. Sung by Mile. Jenny Baur

'* Stratagem is Woman's Power," Ballad, Sung by Miss Kmma Hbywood "Love is a gentle Thing." Ballad. Sung by Miss Emma Hbywood *' A Young and Artless Maiden," Romance. Sung by Herf Reichardt "There's Truth in Woman still." Romance. Sung by Herr Keichaiudt ...

"The Monks were Jolly Boys." Ballad. Sung"by Herr Formks

"In my Chateau of Poaipernik." Aria Buffa. Suug by Herr FOrmba \—

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FANTASIAS, QUADRILLES AND WALTZES.

Brlnley Richards* Fantasia, on ** Once too Often" ,. 1 4s. Od.

Emile Berger's Fautasia, on *' Once too often" ■ ... •»* ... 3s. Od.

"Fontainbleau Quadrille/' by Strauss. (Handsomely Illustrated in Colours) 4i. Od.

"La Belle Blanche Waltz," ditto 4s. Od.

"Mr. Glover's operetta is a decided, and what is better, a legitimate, * hit.' The songs before us have already attained a well-merited popularity. * The monks were jolly boys' is as racy as the best of the old English ditties, harmonised with equal luaintness and skill, and thoroughly well suited to the voice of Herr Formes. 'The

quaiotness and skill, and thoroughly well suited to the voice of Herr Formes, love you've slighted still Is tn

ballad in its way is ' A youn^ ut with an elegantly melodious phr to our liking, however, than any of the foregoing, excellent and genuine as they are. is

bve you've slighted still Is true' (for Mile. Jenny Baur) has a melody of charming freshness. Not less a model ballad in its way is * A young and artless maiden ' (for Herr Reichardt), which sets out with an elegantly melodious phrase. Perhaps more

Love is a gentle thing' (for Miss Emma Heywood), which enters the more refined regions of the ballad-school, and attains an expression as true as it 1* graceful. The opening holds out a promise which the 6equel entirely i\±l&\*."—Musical H

London : Duncan Davison & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

MEYERBEER.

THE POLLOWTNG COMPOSITIONS, by this eminent Composer, are published by DUNCAN DAVIDSON & CO.:—

VOCAL.

H Here on the mountain," with Clarionet obbiigato... •« ••• ...

Violin or Violoncello in lieu of Clarionet, each "Near to thee," with VioloncelU obbiigato ... ... ... ...

"The Fischermaideu" .„ ... ... ... «. ... ...

The Lord's Prayer for Four Voices, with Organ ad lib. ... ... .«

Separate Vocal Parts, each ... ... ...

"This house to love is holy." Serenade for Eight Voices ... ...

Sep. irate Vocal parts, each ... ... ...

'* Aspiration," for Bass, Solo, and Chorus of 3 Soprauos, 2 Tenors,and 1 Bass

PIANOFORTE.

Royal Wedding March (Quatrieme Marche aux flambeaux). Composed for the marriage of the Princess Royal of England with Prince Frederick William of Prussia ... ... ... .-. ... ... ••* ...

Ditto, as a duet ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

Published by Duncan Davison & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

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EW SONGS BY HENRY SMART..-

"Flower of my garden" , «♦ ... 3s.

11 When the wind blows in from the sea" (duet for Soprano and

Barytone) At.

London: Duncan Davison & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

TVTEW SONGS BY J. P KNIGHT, Composer of

I 1 '* She wore a wreath of roses " and 11 Say, what shall my song be to-night?"

s.rf.

"Sleep and the past," Canzonet. Sung by Mite. Ida Gillies* ... ... 3 0

"Let life be bright." Ballad, Poetry by Harriet Power ... .. ... 3 0

"The voice of Dreams." Song, Poetry, by the Rev. Hamilton Dicker 3 0

London: Duncan Davison & Co., 244 Regent Street, W.

TARANTELLA, by Walter Macfarren, played by the Composer with distinguished success, is published, price is, by Duncan DaviSon & Co.,244 Regent Street, W«_

Just Published. «THE CAPTIVITY.»

'A SACRED ORATORIO,

LES ECHOS DES FORETS

(FOREST ECHOES). DOLKA, Composed by A. RIEDEL, Bandmaster of the

I Gendarmerie of the Imperial Guard, played by the Band of the Gendarmerie at the Horticultural Gardens, and always encored. Now ready, for the Pianoforte. Price 3s.

BY

FRANCIS HOWELL, FIRST PERFORMED AT BIRMINGHAM, MARCH 13, 1862.

THE NEW OPERETTA, BLONDE OR BRUNETTE,

WRITTEN BY
P. WOOLER, ESQ.,:

THE MUSIC COMPOSED BY
W. M. LUTZ.

WOW US ON

. 11 AOT I. 1. Overture. 2. Duet. “Sir I my sister's reputation.” Tenor and Barytone ... 3. Song. "Merry little Maud." Tenor ... 4. Duet. "See your lover at your feet.", Sopranos ... 5. Duet. “Is that what all lovers say?" Soprano and Tenor 6. Trio. “Whoe'er would trust," Sopranos and Barytone 7. Song. "'Tis gone! the Hope that once did beam." Soprano 8. Song. “Hurrah ! for the Chase.” Barytone ... ... m 9. Finale. “ Farewell, for ever."

. . .ACT II. 10. Serenade. "As I lay under the Linden Tree." Tenor 11. Ballad. “Love's brightest dream." Soprano ... 12. Quartet. “Ah! I fear he sees resemblance." Soprano, Tenor, and Barytones 13. Song."" The Belle of Ballingarry." Soprano ... ... ... . 14. Duet. “Which is mine, the hand or flower?" Soprano and Tenor 15. Song. “How oft unkindly thus we chide." Barytone ... ... ... ... 16. Trio. “Hold ! you wish to fight, I see.” Soprano, Tenor, and Barytone ... 17. Ballad. “Sweet Maiden, mine!" Teuor ... ... ... ... ... ... 18. Finale. “Mine, at last."

... 26

WHO

No. 1.-Overture
2.- In the third year ...

Recit Contralto.
3.-How doth the city sit solitary

Recit. Acct.-Contralto. 4.-Judah is gone into captivity ... Chorus. 5.-In the second year ... ... Recit.-Bass. 6. There is not a man ... ... Chorus. 7.-Then Daniel spake and said

Recit.— Tenor. 8.-But there is a God in heaven

Air.— Tenor. 9.--Then was the secret revealed

Recit.--Soprano. 10.-Blessed be the name of God

Air.- Soprano. 11.-He revealeth the deep and secret

things ... ... ... ... Chorus. 12.-Nebuchadnezzar the King made an

image ... ... ... ... Recit.- Soprano.
13.-Confounded be all they ... ... Air.—Soprano.
14.-Their idols are silver and gold ... Chorus.
15.-- For Thou, Lord, wilt give Thy blessings Air.-Contralto..
16.-Wherefore at that time ... ... Recit.-Bass.
17.-These men, O King ... ... Chorus.
18.-Then Nebuchadnezzar in his rage ... Recit. Acct.-Bass.
19.- And who is that God ? ... ... Air.-Bass.
20.-Hath God forgotten to be gracious ? Air.—Soprano.
21.-Our God whom we serve ... Trio.-T. T.B.
22.—They that wait upon the Lord Chorns.
23.—Then was Nebuchadnezzar ... ... Recit. Acct..Bass.
24.—How great are His signs ... ... Air.- Bass.
25.--Blessed art Thou ... ... ... Double Chorus.
26.--Belshazzar the King made a great

feast ... ... ... ... Recit.- Tenor.
27.-They drank wine ... ... ... Chorus.
28.-In the same hour ...

Recit. Acct.- Contralto. 29.-Lo ! this is the man

Air.--Contralto. 30.-Then Daniel answered and said Recit. Acct.— Tenor. 31.–March of the Medes and Persians ... 32. In that night

Recit.--Bass. 33.-How art thou fallen

Quartet.-S.C. T. B. 34.-The Lord hath broken

Chorus. 35.-My mouth shall speak

Air.-Bass. 36.—For He is the living God

Chorus. 37.-In all the things ...

Air.-Contralto.
38.-For we have sinned ...

Chorus.
39.-Yet deliver us not up ... ... Air.— Tenor.
40.-To whom Thou hast spoken

Chorus.
41.-Behold, the days come ... Recit.—Soprano.
42.- ye angels ... ... ... Air.- Soprano.
43.-( all ye powers ...

Chorus.
44.-Rejoice ye with Jerusalem ... Air.- Tenor.
45.–O give thanks ... ... ... Double Chorus.

Pianoforte and other Arrangements in the Press.

THALBERG'S NEW COMPOSITIONS.
ELODIES OF SCHUBERT.-Transcribed for the

Pianoforte.
No. 1. Die Taüschung.

2. Der Neugierige.

3. Die Post.

Complete, Price 48. “ Home, sweet Home !" Fantasia .. ... ... ... ... ... .. 30 Last rose of Summer." do. ... ...

As performed by M. THALBERG, at his Concerts, with great success.

...

...

4

THALBERG'S SONG.—“WITHIN THE CONVENT GARDEN," with German and English Words.

Price 2s.

Now Ready, EXHIBITION MUSICAL SOUVENIR. AN ENTIRELY NEW WORK, containing Original 6 Contributions of Vocal and Pianoforte Music, by Balle, Hatton, H. Smart, Brinley Richards, Glover, and most of our popular English Composers. Illustrated by the best Artists, and most handsomely bound. Price One Guinea

Exhibited, Class 16, No. 3425, as a Specimen of Music Engraving and Printing, and Chromo. Lithography,

METZLER & co.

METZLER & CO. 37, 38 & 35 GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W. 37, 38 & 35 GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W.

AND

AND PIANOFORTE AND HARMONIUM WAREROOMS at No. 16.

PIANOFORTE AND HARMONIUM WAREROOMS AT No. 16.

Printed by GEORGE ANDREW SPOTTISWOODE, or No. 12 James Street, Buckingham Cate, in the Parish of St. Margaret, in the City of Westminster, at No.5 New-strept Square,

In the Parish of St. Bride in tbe City of London. Published by JOHN BOOHRY, at the Office of BOOSRY & SONS, 28 Holles Street. Saturday, August 9, 1862

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"The Wobtii Op Art Appears Most Eminent In Mdsic, Since It Beqdibjss No Material, No Subject-matter, Whose Effect Must Be Deducted: It Is Wholly Form And Power, And It Raises And Ennobles Whatever It Expresses"Gstht.

SUBSCRIPTION—Stamped for Postage—20s. PEE ANNUM Payable in advance by Cash or Post-Offiee Order to B00SEY & SONS, 28 Holies Street, Cavendish Square, London, W.

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THE ENGLISH OPERA ASSOCIATION

(LIMITED).

IN SHARES OF £2 EACH. £1 PER SHARE TO BE
PAID UP ON ALLOTMENT; THE REMAINING £1 PER SHARE WILL
NOT BE CALLED UP UNLESS NECESSARY.

CERTAIN PRIVILEGES ARE GIVEN TO SHAREHOLDERS.
Temporary Offices:
69 REGENT STREET, W., NEXT ST. JAMES'S HALL.

rriHE ENGLISH OPERA ASSOCIATION (Limited)

JL is founded for ttie purpose of establishing a National Institution, to produce and maintain on the English Stage, in an effective and complete manner, the Works of Native Composers; and likewise English Adaptations or Translations from the French, German, Italiau, and other Schools.

Executive Committee. The Right Honourable the Eahl of Westmorland, C.B., 8 South Audley Street. J. H. Arkwright. Esq., Hampton Court, Leominster.

The Honourable F. H. F. Berkeley, M.P., I Victoria Square, Pimlico, S.W.

Frederic Davihon, Esq., 24 Fitzroy Square, W.

Colon*. H. P. D« Bathe. 00 Piccadilly, W.

The Honourable Seymour Egertd.v. 7 Grosvenor Square, W.

Cuandos Wren Hoskyns, Esq., 27 Berkeley Square, W.

Edward James, Esq., Q.C., 24 Upper Wimpole Street, W.

Alexander H. Ross, Esq., GO Portland Place, W.

AUDITOR":.

Robfrt Addison, Esq. (amdison, HoLLitiH & Lvcas), 210 Regent Stre „ ..
Gkokgb Wood, Esq. (cramer Bealk A Wood), 201 Regent Street, W.

Persons ii tending to become Shareholders, and who have not yet sent iu an Application for Shares, arc requested t'j do so forthwith.

Forms of Application and Prospectuses may be obtained at the Company's Office, 69 flogent Street, and all the principal Musicseliers in Town and Country.

Martin Cawood, Secretary.

MR. SIMS REEVES will sing Howard Glover's very popular song, "SHE MAY SMILE ON MANY, SHE WILL LOVE BUT ONE," at the approaching Gloucester Festival.

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PROVINCIAL TOUR, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, and DECEMBER, 1SG2.

ARTISTS.

MAD. GASSIER

(Her first appearance in the Provinces these three years),

MLLE. MARIE CRUVELLI

(Of the Grand Imperial Opera, Berlin;,

MR. SWIFT

(The popular English Tenor),

HERB JOSEPH HERMANNS

(PRIMO BASSO)

(01 Her Majesty's Theatre). INSTRUMENTALISTS.

SOLO PUNISTE,

MAD. ARABELLA GODDARD

SOLO VIOLINIST,

MON. SAINTON

CONTRA. BASSO,

SIGNOR BOTTESINI

(His first appearance in the Provinces these two years).

DIRECTOR.
MR. LAND

To whom communications should be addressed, 4 Cambridge Place, Regent's
Park, N.W., or to Mr. snumw, 28 Grosvenor Street, W.

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MUSIC IN BERLIN.

(From our own Correspondent.)

Mr chronique musicale, properly so-called, will not be very long this week, for the simple reason that I have not much to offer you in the way of news. However, I will do the best I can, and no one, as far as I know, can well do more. The first fact to be recorded is the appearance of the liliputian violinists, Jnlie and Juliette Delepierre, at the Victoria Theatre. Without going into a detailed account of their performances, I may observe, that they were greatly applauded, and vociferously summoned at the conclusion of the entertainment to bow, or rather curtsey, their thanks. For myself, however, the sight was not a pleasing one, I do not like infant prodigies, and when I saw these two little children standing before the astonished and excited audience, with scarcely a smile upon their tiny faces, and a " plentiful lack" of animation in their large, lustreless eyes, I could not help asking myself the question, What must they have gone through; to what severe and exhausting training must they have been subjected; how must they have been isolated and cut off from all the usual sports and pastimes of childhood—nay, almost infancy—to be enabled to attain such a degree of skill? The subject, to my mind, at least, is a sad one, well adapted to the moralisings of any modern "melancholy Jacques."

All Berlin has gone mad about the Japanese Ambassadors, who have been feted, lionised, and caressed to within an inch of their lives, that is, unless they are blessed with such superhuman constitutions as not to feel that pleasure may sometimes be attended with fatigue. Among other entertainments got up for their especial behoof, by Royal command, was a monster military concert, at the above theatre. Both the buildings — the so-called summer and winter theatres — were flung into one, so as to form a single immense hall, in which the different bands were heard to the greatest advantage. All the pieces, performed with admirable dash and precision, were warmly applauded. The performances of the warrior musicians were varied by the execution of "Le Carnaval de Venise," played by the little Dclepierres. The gardens attached to the establishment were gaily decorated, and illuminated like poor old Vauxhall on extraordinary occasions in days of yore, by I do not know how many thousand additional lamps, the interesting strangers expressing their satisfaction with an amount of demonstrative eagerness contrasting strangely with the stoical placidity which, I hear, was the prominent characteristic of their demeanour in London. At Kroll's, also, a grand concert, followed by tableaux vivants, which appeared to please them mightily, was given for their delectation. Determined not to be behindhand in politeness, and actuated slightly by the knowledge that the public is sure to follow wherever the Japanese go, the management of the Friedrich-Wilhelmstadtischcs Theatre gave them a concert and a grand display of fireworks. Tho programme comprised, among other things, Offenbach's Orpheus, the libretto being considerably abridged, and, moreover, translated into English for the benefit, I was informed, of the illustrious foreigners, though how it could benefit them I am at a loss to discover, as I do not think they know much more of English than of German; they are certainly far better acquainted with High Dutch than either. The sisters Delepierre, who did not prove a pecuniary success at the Victoria Theatre, have moved to this establishment. I hope they may be more fortunate in their new quarters, but I have no very firm faith in the realisation of my hope.

Mad. Rcttich, the celebrated tragic actress, or, to use the word now in fashion, tragedienne, from the Imperial Burg-Theater, Vienna, has been declaiming Schiller's ballad, "Hero und Leander," with a musical accompaniment by Lindpaintner. I am not at all astonished that a musician should be worked up by his admiration for a production like "Hero und Leander " to illustrate it musically, but, at the same time, I must frankly avow my opinion that a mixed composition of this class —declaration and accompanying music—possesses no vitality, because it is surrounded by insurmountable drawbacks in the way of execution. In the first place, the harmony of the whole is materially affected by the circumstance that, at stated intervals, the progress of the poem is suspended, in order that the musical composer may have an opportunity of colouring, and imparting greater force of expression to the words of the poet. Pauses thus intervene, which cut up the poem and have a prejudicial effect upon the dramatic interest. Such phrases are probably painful to the audience, who follow the declamation with breathless eagerness, and yearn for the catastrophe. Besides this, every speaking voice becomes powerless, when, as in the present instance, in the description of the tempest, it attempts to dominate over tho orchestra playing fortissimo; it is like a Jew's harp trying to drown the swelling and majestic tones of the organ at the Crystal Palace; the words are generally lost, while the music, with its merely general forms of expression, is incapable of supplying their absence. Thus the effect of the whole is merely the kind of half-and-half, and, by no means, satisfactory

one. Lindpaintncr's music — written in Spohr's style—is sometimes happy and characteristic, but deficient in originality, and certainly not to be compared with the poem it is intended to illustrate. The orchestra, under the direction of Herr Hauptner, performed its task, not at all an easy one, by the way, with excellent judgement and gratifying success.

Brendel's'Musik-Zeitung has just found a mare's nest of colossal proportions. Herr Gustav Schmidt announced a new opera, entitled La fitole. At this the publication in question was exceedingly irate, asserting that a French title was unsuited for a German opera. It went on to say, also, that La Reole was simply nonsense; a typographical error for L'Aureole, or La Creole. Alas for the infallibility of Brendets Musik-Zeitung! "La Reole" is the name of a town on the Garonne, in the department of the Gironde, and, as the story is laid there, the opera has been called by the composer La Rtole. I would strongly recommend that a gazeteer be forthwith added to the paste, scissors, and other editorial accessaries in the editor's room of Brendel's MusiA-Zeituny.

Concerning the movements of musical artists, I may mention that Herr Poorten, a violinist, has arrived from St. Petersburg, where, according to report, he is highly esteemed as an executant and composer. Herr Th. Kullack has gone to drink the waters at Reichcnhall, and Herr Wieprccht has proceeded to Kissengen. Mile. Artot is paying a visit to her family at Brussels; Mad. Burde-Ney, stopping with her sister at Linz. Herr Paul Taglioni, of the Royal Opera House, goes as ballet-master, during the next carnival season, to La Scala, Milan. I have already told you that my clironique musicale would not be very long this week. The proof is in your hands. J'ai tout dit.

Vale.

PARIS.

(From our own Correspondent.') The Parisians themselves appear to be getting gradually tired of the eternal repetition of the same round of operas, and it may actually be affirmed that the musical public is progressing towards something better, if only because they are returning with pleasure to the productions of the good old school, and by degrees getting over their ravenous hunger for novelty, and nothing but novelty. Whether the fashion or custom of introducing^classical instrumental works, at concerts and matinees— whether the Conservatory Concerts, and, still more, the Symphony Performances of Pasdcioup, are evoking a taste for operatic music of sterling worth, is something I will not positively assert, but it seems as if such was the fact. At the Grand Opera, for instance, they have gone back to Halevy's Juive, and are rehearsing Auber's Muette, which is to be revived with everything new. At tho Opera Comiquc they have even taken up Pcrgolcsi's Servante Maitresse, and Gretry's Azor et Zfmire. They are, moreover, giving Le Macon and HaydCe, besides preparing Boieldieu's Jean de Paris, in which the tenor Warnotz will make his first appearance. A little later La Dame Blanche will follow, with Achard as George Brown, as Roger has now retired, and intends living on his income, which he thinks of increasing considerably by the sale of his chateau and park, with its Halevy, Mozart, and Rossini Alleys, its Meyerbeer, Adam, and Rossini "Places," &c, &c

In the way of novelty, there will be Hector Berlioz's Beatrice et Benedict, the general rehearsal of which has already taken place in the Theatre Lyrique, and greatly pleased an audience specially invited. But is it a novelty for Paris b-. that is the question. The opera was to be given in Baden-Baden on the 11th inst. Berlioz will have no resource left but to send his Trojans as well to Baden-Baden, if he wishes to see it produced. But even this would be attended with difficulties, as M. Bennzet is said to patronise "Greeks " more than Trojans.

Rossini has taken up his abode in his new villa at Passy, near Paris. The villa is situated close to the railway station, and it is reported that the old maestro, whose ears are so frequently stunned by the noise of the locomotives, has just composed a piece in which he introduces, with incomparable humour, the whizzing, fizzing, squeaking, creaking, groaning and moaning of the engines; the ringing of the bells; the hallooing of the conductors, and, in a word, the infernal hubbub which characterises all railway stations. This looks like him, for he is fond of a joke. But he is far more serious than many persons believe. Whenever an artist talks with him about music, he displays great warmth of heart, and great enthusiasm for the masters of his art, especially for the immortal Mozart. The readers of the Mdsicajl. Would nmy, perhaps, remember the dialogues between Rossini and Ferdinand Hiller, published two or three years ago in this paper. In these interesting cliulogues, mention is made of the talented singing-master. Piermarini, whom Rossini values very highly. As a mark of his respect the latter sent Piermarini a portrait of Mozart, under which he had written in a bold

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