Whisky: Technology, Production and Marketing

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Inge Russell, Graham Stewart
Academic Press, Jul 10, 2003 - Medical - 384 pages
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Whisky: Technology, Production and Marketing explains in technical terms, the science and technology of producing whisky, combined with information from industry experts on successfully marketing the product. World experts in Scotch whisky provide detailed insight into whisky production from the processing of raw materials, to the fermentation, distillation, maturation, blending, production of co-products and quality testing, as well as important information on the methodology used for packaging and marketing whisky in the twenty-first century. No other book covers the entire whisky process from raw material to delivery to the market in such a comprehensive manner and with such a high level of technical detail.

* Only available work to cover the entire whisky process from raw material to delivery to the market in such a comprehensive manner
* Includes a chapter on marketing and selling whisky
* Foreword written by Alan Rutherford, former Chairman and Managing Director of United Malt and Grain Distillers Ltd.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 History of the development of whisky distillation
1
raw materials and processing
27
raw materials and processing
77
Chapter 4 Yeast and fermentation
117
Chapter 5 Batch distillation
155
Chapter 6 Grain whisky distillation
181
Chapter 7 Maturation and blending
211
Chapter 8 Coproducts
245
Chapter 9 Whisky analysis
277
Chapter 10 Marketing Scotch whisky
311
Index
353
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About the author (2003)

Inge Russell is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Institute of Brewing, a Visiting Professor at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, a Professor at the Alltech Brewing and Distilling Academy and a Fellow of the Institute of Brewing. She has over 40 years of research experience in the brewing and distilling industry. She has served as President of both the American Society of Brewing Chemists (ASBC) and the Master Brewers Association of the Americas (MBAA). She holds a PhD and DSc from the University of Strathclyde in Scotland. She has authored over 150 papers in the area of yeast biotechnology and is a co-founder and co-editor of the journal “Critical Reviews in Biotechnology .

Graham G. Stewart has been Emeritus Professor in Brewing and Distilling at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland since he retired in 2007. From 1994-2007 he was Professor of Brewing and Distilling and Director of the International Centre for Brewing and Distilling (ICBD), Heriot-Watt University. For 25 years prior to this he was employed by the Labatt Brewing Company in Canada, holding a number of scientific/technical positions and from 1986-1994 was its Technical Director. He holds a PhD and DSc from Bath University and is a Fellow of the Institute of Brewing. He was President of the Institute of Brewing and Distilling in 1999 and 2000. He has over 300 publications (books, patents, review papers, articles and peer reviewed papers) to his name and is a co-founder and co-editor of the journal “Critical Reviews in Biotechnology .

Charles W. Bamfforth, PhD, DSc, FIBD,FIBiol, FIAFoST is the Anheuser-Busch Endowed Professor of Malting and Brewing Sciences at the University of California, Davis. He has held positions as director of research for Brewing Research International and as research and quality assurance manager for Bass Breweries in the UK. He is the author of numerous books and papers as well as being the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Society of Brewing Chemists.

Dr. Bamforth specializes in the science of malting and brewing. His current research program focuses primarily on the wholesomeness of beer, including studies on the psychophysics of beer perception, on polyphenols and on the residues from non-starchy polysaccharide digestion that constitute soluble fiber and potential prebiotics in beer. Research in the laboratory also embraces the enzymology of the brewing process, foam stability, preventing oxidation in wort and beer and alternative paradigms for beer production. He has received the Award of Distinction, American Society of Brewing Chemists, 2011, and the Cambridge Prize, Institute of Brewing, 1984

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